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Tai Chi Kung 18 positions

exemplified by videos and pictures where you'll discover knowledge about a systems of life balance energy (Body, Mind and Spirit) now practiced by millions of people worldwide, primarily for its health benefits. If you feel tired and
 
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do not have your usual efficiency, it's time to do something new, beside a health insurance plan, began to practice Tai Chi. You'll easy learn here about Tai Chi Kung positions. A 2010 comprehensive review concluded that T'ai chi and Chi Kung practice played a positive role in quality of life, bone density, immune and cardiovascular functions, longevity, decreased stress and anxiety. Taijiquan involves rhythmic breathing, coordinated with slow stylized repetition of fluid movement, and a calm mindful state. The focus is typically more on healing or meditation than martial applications. The majority of health studies have displayed a tangible benefit as other forms of exercise. As a recognition, Tai chi ch'uan and Qigong is celebrated in the last Saturday of April each year in sixty countries since 1999.

Watch Tai Chi Kung videos with the succession of the 18 positions, accompanied by descriptions and pictures.
Tai Chi Kung 1st position: Breathing
Tai Chi Kung 1st position: Breathing
also known as "Raising the arms" or "Tai Chi Kung Start"
  2nd position: Opening the Chest
Tai Chi Kung 2nd position: Opening the Chest
as a sequence of four movements. Raise your arms in front above shoulder level...
  3rd position: Rainbow Dance
Tai Chi Kung 3rd position: Rainbow Dance
or "Painting a Rainbow" Lao Gong point from the left palm oriented to the sky...
 
4th position: Separating the Clouds
Tai Chi Kung 4th position: Separating the Clouds
From starting position, raise your arms at your sides...
  5th position: Rolling the Arms
Tai Chi Kung 5th position: Rolling the Arms
also called "Rolling the Arms in a Horse-riding Stance."
  6th position: Rowing a Boat
Tai Chi Kung 6th position: Rowing a Boat
also known with the name of "Rowing a Boat in the Middle of a Lake."
 
7th position: Lifting the Ball
Tai Chi Kung 7th position: Lifting the Ball
or "Carry Ball in Front of the Shoulders."
  8th position: Looking at the Moon
Tai Chi Kung 8th position: Looking at the Moon
also known as "Turn to Look at the Moon"
  9th position: Pushing the Palms
Tai Chi Kung 9th position: Pushing the Palms
or "Turning the Waist and Pushing with the Palm"
 
10th position: Cloud Hands in Horse Stance
Tai Chi Kung 10th position: Cloud Hands in Horse Stance
known also as "Cloud Hands in a Horse-riding Stance" stance or simply "Cloud Hands".
  11th position: Scooping the Sea Looking at the Sky
Tai Chi Kung 11th position: Scooping the Sea Looking at the Sky
or "Scooping the Sea and Looking at the Horizon" stance or "Touch the Sea Looking at the Sky".
  12th position: Pushing the Waves
Tai Chi Kung 12th position: Pushing the Waves
Arms raised to chest height, palms facing forward. Stretch your right leg in front with toes up. Your body rests on the left leg...
 
13th position: Punching in a Horse Stance
Tai Chi Kung 13th position: Punching in a Horse Stance
also known as "Punching in a Horse-riding Stance" stance or "Punching."
  14th position: Flying Wild Goose
Tai Chi Kung 14th position: Flying Wild Goose
Raise your arms at 45 degrees laterally...
  15th position: Rotating the Wheel
Tai Chi Kung 15th position: Rotating the Wheel
also known as "Turn like a flying wheel" stance or "Turning Like A Wheel".
 
16th position: Flying Pigeon
Tai Chi Kung 16th position: Flying Pigeon
Stretch your right leg in front with toes up...
  17th position: Balancing the Chi Sau Gong position: Marching Bouncing a Ball
Tai Chi Kung 17th position: Marching Bouncing a Ball
also known as "Stepping and Bouncing a Ball" stance or "Marching Whilst Bouncing The Ball"
  18th position: Balancing the Chi Sau Gong
Tai Chi Kung 18th position: Balancing the Chi Sau Gong
also known as "Balancing the Chi to Close" stance or "Sau Gong".
Used as therapy for chronic pain and limited mobility, but its greatest power is preventive. Studies of tai chi show it reduces blood pressure, episodes of anxiety and depression, and symptoms of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. It also helps give a boost to the immune system, builds bone mass, and improves chronic pain, limited mobility, balance and coordination.

Helpful points in practice
Baihui point - GV 20
Baihui point (Hundred Convergences) - GV 20 (Governing vessel meridian)
  Hegu - LI 4
Hegu - LI 4 (Large intestine meridian)
  Dan Tian - CV 4
Dan Tian - CV 4 (Conception vessel meridian)
 
Lao-Gong - PC 8
Lao-Gong (Palace of Toil) - PC 8 (Pericardium meridian)
at the center of the palm between the 2nd and 3rd metacarpal bones closer to the radial side of the 3rd
  Warm-Up exercise
Warm-Up exercise
  Tai Chi Kung park practice
Tai Chi Kung park practice
 
Recommendations You can practice Tai Chi Kung wherever you find a quiet place, well aired, even in a room with large open windows. In order to isolated from unwanted noise, you can use a headset, where eventually, listen relaxing music. The best place is in the park (in an area without trees) or in a water shore.

For yourself to be more easily, try the following steps:
a. watch each video 1-2 times;
b. close your eyes and try to visualize the movements; if everything is OK, proceed to next step; if not, review it once again;
c. execute the sequence of movements several times; first, concentrate on accuracy of movement; then control your breath (inspiration and expiration times); after you have succeeded that, visualize the movements and relax; finally, enjoy the energy that harmonize your body.

Two general guidelines
1. First of all, you don't forget to do the warm up;
2. Remember, that after the practice of each position, you have to go back starting position, Dan Tian point, your Qi energy center. For women, the right hand over Dan Tian point area and left hand on top. For men it is vice versa.

Stress health
A systematic review and meta-analysis, funded in part by the U.S. government, of the current studies on the effects of practicing t'ai chi ch'uan found that: "Twenty-one of 33 randomized and nonrandomized trials reported that 1 hour to 1 year of regular t'ai chi significantly increased psychological well-being including reduction of stress, anxiety, and depression, and enhanced mood in community-dwelling healthy participants and in patients with chronic conditions. Seven observational studies with relatively large sample sizes reinforced the beneficial association between t'ai chi practice and psychological health."