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Zulu Dawn (1979) script

by Cy Endfield and Anthony Story

 
1.	SCRIPT APPEARS ON BLACK SCREEN:

One hundred years ago the British Colony of Natal in Southern 
Africa was surrounded by a vast and independent Zulu Kingdom.

In 1879, a banle took place that was forever to alter the course of colonial history:

I SANDHLWANA

2 EXT. DAWN.

Four Zulu's are seen in silhouette herding cattle up a hill.

3.	LONG SHOT - Two Zulu's are seen in silhouette high on a 
precipice.

4.	Seven Zulu's are seen walking in silhouette against the 
sunrise.

5.	The sun fills the screen as the sound of many running feet 
and Zulu drums are heard.

6.	EXT. ZULU KRAAL. DAY.

A large regiment of Zulu warriors carrying shields and assegais 
(stabbing spears)
are seen running into the Kraal whilst the sound of tribal 
singing, chanting and drum
beating escalates.

7.	Inside the camp a group of Zulu's are seen grappling with a 
bull as they struggle to
bring the animal to the ground. They are watched by a vast 
circle of warriors all
shouting encouragement.

8.	An elaborate tribal dance ensues. It appears to be some sort 
of Fenility Rite. The
females stand opposite the men in rows, chanting as they move 
in closer.

9.	CETSHWAYO, the great Zulu King emerges into the throng. He is 
tall, beautifully
fat, with a big intelligent face and superb dignity. He surveys 
his subjects with
interest as they stand unanimous, thrusting their assegais into 
the air whilst shouting
their allegiance.

10.	EXT. HIGH COMMISSIONER'S RESIDENCE, PIETERMARITZBURG,
NATAL. NIGHT.

BARTLE FRERE (V.0.)
Reading aloud the letter he has just written.

Cetshwayo '5 Zulu army to disband and the warriors permitted to 
return
to their homes.
2

11.	SWITCH TO INTERIOR. FRERE is seated at his desk whilst LORD
CHELMSFORD is seen in the background standing on the veranda.

BARTLE FRERE
He continues to read aloud:

Present military system to be abandoned. New regulations 
concerning
the defence of the realm worked out.

CHELMSFORD enters the room, sits and studies two sheets of 
paper.
FRERE continues:

All who do not submit will be dealt with as enemies of the 
Crown. We
will not permit the arbitrary killing and  

FRERE pauses as he underlines a certain word:

and unjust oppression which the Zulu people have suffered from 
their
own King Cetshwayo

Pausing, FRERE looks up as if to meet his comrade's gaze. 
CHELMSFORD,
however, continues to read, turning the page.

BARTLE FRERE
You '11 see from the letter that this ultimatum is our decision 
alone. Her
Majesty's government seems to prefer a negotiated settlement

12.	CLOSE UP of CHELMSFORD's letter:

Her Majesty's government confidentially hope that by the 
exercise of prudence
and by meeting of the Zulus in a spirit of forbearance and 
reasonable
compromise it will be possible to avert the very serious evil 
of a war with
Cetshwayo:

13.	Return to BARTLE FRERE. As he melts some sealing wax over a 
silver burner:

BARTLE FRERE
(Referring to the letter he has just completed)
Does this do what we both know to be right Frederick?

CHELMSFORD
It does Sir Henry (He folds the papers neatly in half) 
excellently.

The pair exchange glances as BARTLE FRERE applies the wax to his
letter.

14.	CLOSE UP of stamped seal.

15.	EXT. CHELMSFORD'S CAMP PIETERMARITZBURG. DAY
3

Activity everywhere, the incessant movement of an army in the 
final stages of its
formation. Huge ox-wagons are being hauled into the camp.

16.	CHELMSFORD and CREALOCK are on horseback in full regaJia as 
they ride into
the centre of the Camp.

17.	Squads of Basuto-infantry - tall, rangy bodies, naked except 
for a loincloth and neck
ornaments - are being drilled by foul mouthed, bullying 
European NCO's.

18.	LT. MELVILL, young, dapper, inspects the Martini Henry 
rifles of a company of
REDCOATS who are lined up near the BASUTOS. A CSM (SOT. 
WILLIAMS)
stalks behind MELVILL.

ONE REDCOAT, young, thin, gangling, turns his head slightly to 
peek at the
Basutos, and the swift eye of SOT. WILLIAMS detects the 
disaffection. The young
redcoat (PTE. WILLIAMS) turns, guilty at being caught out of 
the 'Attention'
position. The CSM (SOT. WILLIAMS) leans forward until his face 
is one inch
from that of his quavering prey.

SGT. WILLIAMS (Shouting)
	You moved  (With more restraint) You moved		go and tell the NCO
	of that black shambles that you love 'im more than you love
	me	(Shouting) NOW'

19.	PTE. WILLIAMS blinks, swallows then runs over to the 
Basuto's NCO.

NCO (Addressing the Basutos)
You're not fit to be in the British army you different coloured 
articles.
STRAIGHTEN UP! You're like a load of bloody herd boys! (He
suddenly becomes aware of PTE. WILLIAMS' presence).

PTE. WILLIAMS
I'm to tell you Corporal, that I love you more than my Colour 
Sergeant

The Basuto's NCO walks up to PTE. WILLIAMS.

NCO
That's frightening... Get out of my bloody sight lad. And put 
your rifle
over your head and double round this field (shouting) until you 
drop
bloody dead. Now move, get on with it, at the double.

The Basutos, laughing, raise their shields into the air in 
general amusement as
PRIVATE WILLIAMS runs past.

NCO
Shut up! Get back in the ranks you shower of animals.

20.	CHELMSFORD, still on horseback, surveys the encampment. He 
salutes to SOT.
WILLIAMS. CREALOCK, as always, is in attendance.
21.
4

SGT. WILLIAMS
Facing the ranks:
Company   Shoulder arms.... (LT. MELVILLjoins SOT.
WILLIAMS) Present   arms.

LT. MELVILL turns standing to attention, saluting as CHELMSFORD 
passes.

22.	Two BOERS ride into the camp, passing two SUTLERS wagons. We 
see SOT.
WILLIAMS' dismissed COMPANY hurriedly crowding round one of the
SUTLER'S wagons, shouting for cigars and gin.

23.	The two BOERS, one an elderly man, one a boy of sixteen, 
have dismounted. SOT.
WILLIAMS strides over to them.

You passing through?

SGT. WILLIAMS

ELDERLY BOER
We 've come to fight the Zulu.

SGT. WILLIAMS
We aren't at war yet Referring to the boy: Bit young 'in' he?

ELDERLY BOER
He's my nephew... he can shoot, track and speak Zulu and fight 
like
hell... he's got Assegai marks to prove it...

He gestures to the boy to show SOT. WILLIAMS. The YOUNG BOER 
pulls
up his shin, showing an horrendous white scar across his 
stomach.
SOT. WILLIAMS stares in amazement. Coming to, commanding the 
attention
of a BOY-PULLEN in the ranks:

You!

Sir. (Running over)

SGT. WILLIAMS
BOY-PULLEN

SGT. WILLIAMS

Take 'em to the orderly officer. (SOT. WILLIAMS departs).

BOY-PULLEN
(Standing to attention). Colour Sergeant Addressing the BOERS: 
This
way.

24.	The BOERS follow as the PTE. Leads oft
25.	A TROOP OF SIKALI HORSE under the command of COL. DURNFORD 
ride
into the camp. He is a tall, thin-haired man with handsome 
sunburnt features,
intelligent and sensitive eyes and an over-length moustache. He 
has only the use of
5

one arm, his left arm being completely paralyzed and held 
immobile, tucked into a
special pocket he has sewn into his tunic. COL. DURNFORD and 
SOT. MA3OR
KAMBULA (A powerful and intelligent African radiating 
authority.) pull up as the
troop ride by.

26.	With the SIKALI in the foreground, PTE. WILLIAMS is seen in 
the background,
still running, his rifle above his head.

27.	The same NCO seen previously addresses the BASUTOS:

NCO
Company.... 'Shun!
(The BASUTOS comply).
Move yourselves.

28.	SIKALI are seen cantering as if a pre-ordained manoeuvre is 
about to commence.

29.	DURNFORD and S.M. KAMBULA are surveying their troops.

S.M. KAMBULA
Shall I give the order Sir?

COL. DURNFORD
Alright, Sergeant

30.	S.M. KAMBULA rides offscreen.

31. The SIKALI gather together. S.M. KAMBULA's voice is heard 
above the throng:

S.M. KAMBULA
Sikali Horse  Forward!

32.	The SIKALI ride full pelt, charging at the BASUTOS.

The troop continues almost into the first line of the BASUTOS, 
which consists of
their European NCO's.

The European NCO's of the BASUTOS stare at the SIKALI troop as 
they wheel
and once again come galloping at them.

33.	COL. PULLEINE, LT. MELVILL & LT. COGHILL are seen outside 
the Officer's
Mess amused at the commotion.

34.	CLOSE UP. COL. DURNFORD laughing.

35.	The NCO's edge away, unsure, prepared to take to their heels.
The BASUTO infantry watch, admiring, clapping.
6

The troop skilfully turns their horses, as if on a penny, 
inches from the BASUTO
NCO's then ride away, whooping, in high spirits.

LORD CHELMSFORD & COL. CREALOCK, having watched this exhibition,
ride forward to meet COL. DURNFORD.

CHELMSFORD
Splendid horsemanship  Who are they?

DURNFORD
Sikali Horse, My Lord. Christians alL I know each one by name.

CHELMSFORD
They come well recommended do they?
DURNFORD

My Lord, they rode for me at Bushman '5 Pass.

CHELMSFORD
Oh... indeed. Crealock, we should see that Colonel Dumford has 
an
Officer for his hard riders. Perhaps a subaltern from the 
Twenty Fourth.

DURNFORD
I thought it might be more effective to find someone who speaks 
Zulu.

CHELMSFORD & CREALOCK exchange glances.

CREALOCK
Yes. I see you've issued each of them with a Martini Henry 
Carbine.
Our quota for Native contingencies: one rifle to ten men and 
only five
rounds per rifle.

CHELMSFORD
But will they make good use of them?

DURNEORD

They're as good marksmen as horsemen.

CHELMSFORD
There's no doubting their horsemanship Colonel Durnford.

CHELMSFORD & DURNFORD salute.

DURNFORD
Mr. Crealock.

CREALOCK nods.
DURNFORD exits offscreen.
7

CHELMSFORD
We must think how to make best use of Colonel Durnford's African
knowledge.

36.	Through the smoke of the field kitchens enters the 
Honourable WILLIAM
VEREKER, aristocratically aloof on a fine stallion, his servant 
following on an
equally fine horse. He rides purposely towards COL. DURNFORD as 
if he has
been seeking him.

VEREKER
Colonel Durnford... William Vereker. I hear you 've been seeking
Officers?

DURNFORD
Good ones, yes, Mr Vereker. Gentlemen who can ride and shoot

DURNFORD waits for a reaction. VEREKER, cool, looks into 
DURNFORD's
face and takes out his rifle.
Cantering some distance away, VEREKER turns, spurs his horse 
vigorously and,
on reaching DURNFORD, throws his rifle up into the aim. He 
fires one-handed
at the half carcass of a cow being hung up near the field 
kitchens without veering
his galloping horse. The half carcass judders under the impact 
of the heavy
bullet.

37.	PTE. WILLIAMS has been jogging wretchedly on. On hearing the 
bullet he throws
himself to the ground believing he has been shot. Two of the 
kitchen hands help
him to his feet.

38.	CLOSE UP of SOT. WILLIAMS.

SGT. WILLIAMS
Shouting across the field:
Private Williams. You've stopped.

39.	PTE. WILLIAMS regains his composure and, once more lifting 
his rifle above his
head, continues to jog. SGT. WILLIAMS looks on with smug 
satisfaction.

40.	As VEREKER approaches, DURNFORD commands the attention of 
LT. RAW:

DURNFORD
Mr. Raw. Take Mr. Vereker to the Store and see he '5 issued the
necessary equipment And then show him to the Mess and explain 
to him
how an Officer is expected to behave.

RAW salutes and leads VEREKER off left, as DURNFORD watches 
their
departure.

41.	INT. OFFICERS' MESS TENT. DAY
8

CLOSE UP. A scorpion is being removed from a specimen jar with 
a pair of
tweezers. It is lifted out of shot to be examined under a 
magnifying glass revealing
LIEUTENANTS COGHILL & MELVILL seated at an impressive green 
baize table.

There are African servants, white-jacketed. SERGEANT MURPHY, a 
short, broad
humorous, coarse-faced man, supervises the servants.

CHELMSFORD sits alone at a corner table reading his newspaper.

Other Officers are seated around the main table drinking claret 
and smoking the
obligatory cigars. COLONEL PULLEINE is writing a letter whilst 
LT. HARFORD
sits with his tins around him classifying his specimens.

As SOT. MURPHY refills their glasses COGHILL & MELVILL gossip 
covertly in
half whispers so that their voices don't carry to the table of 
their commander.

MELVILL
Lighting COGHILL' 5 cigar:
Our good Colonel Dumford scored quite a coup with the Sikali 
Horse.

COGHILL
Um. There are rumours that my Lord Chelmsford intends to make
Durnford Second in Command.

MELVILL
Well that's typical of Her Majesty's army. Appoint an engineer 
to do a
soldier's work.

PULLEINE
He continues writing without looking up:
Now, now Mr. Melvill, less of your spleen.

COGHILL & MELVILL smile at one another before their attention 
is drawn to
LT. RAW and VEREKER entering the Mess.

RAW
Addressing the Mess:
Stranger in the Mess. Gentlemen. (To CHELMSFORD) My LorJ

The officers and Vereker survey each other.

RAW
To VEREKER: Announce yourself

VEREKER spots CHELMSFORD in the corner.

VEREKER
Good day Frederick.
9

CHELMSFORD
Good day William. (Folding his newspaper, he stands to shake 
hands).
Pleased you could join us.

The OFFICERS turn, a bit startled, to look at this newcomer who 
is somehow on
first-name terms with the Lord General.

VEREKER
It was either that, or join the Zulu.

CHELMSFORD
(Removing his glasses).
Join the Zulu? Oh yes, you're right in the thick of it aren't 
you? Talked to
your father before we sailed.. he said you 'd taken to farming 
near Zulu land.
Sent his regards.. Should I meet up with you.
VEREKER (Wryly)
That was nice of the old boy.

CHELMSFORD
I think you 'd better call out who you are.

VEREKER turns to address the Mess. CHELMSFORD sits.

VEREKER
William Vereker.

Sergeant Murphy.
RAW

MURPHY
Sir?

RAW
Bring drinks for the stranger. Allow me to introduce the Mess:
Colonel Pulleine. Messers. Melvill, Coghill...

With the exception of PULLEINE & MAJOR RUSSELL the Officers 
stand as
they are introduced.

COGHILL
Morning.

During the introductions, SOT. MURPHY selects a large, silver, 
chalice-like
receptacle from a trophy table in another corner. He takes it 
to the head of the
table.

RAW
Jackson, Milne, Major Russel4 Stevenson,.
I0

STEVENSON
How do you do?

RAW
Haiford. . and Haiford's best frienJ

HARFORD raises a glass jar containing one of his prized 
specimens in
acknowledgement.
Meanwhile MURPHY has collected a bottle of claret from a tray 
brought by
another black servant. He pours the contents into the trophy.

RUSSELL
Don 't leave your gin around, Vereker, or Harford will have it 
full of
preserved butteifties. A damned waste, if you ask me.

HARFORD chuckles as he replaces the lid on his jar.

VEREKER
Oh I doubt if I'll leave much of that around. There's quite a 
shortage
where I've been.

COGHILL
Puffing on his cigar:
Theyfight with spears don 't they? I mean it doesn't seem quite 
fair
against the Martini Henry.

MELVILL
You didn't really have to chose between your country and the 
Zulu did
you?

VEREKER
Um. And a damn close thing it was too.

RAW
Taking the freshly filled trophy from MURPHY.
Ah, well done Murphy. (He presents it to VEREKER).

HARFORD
Stranger's Cup. (The Officers sit.) Down it in one and we where 
share
your Mess bill for a week.

VEREKER
And {fI don't?

RAW
Then a bottle of good claret to each member of the Mess is 
charged to
your account

MELVILL
if it's too much we can have the bill forwarded to your 
father... in the
11

House of Lords. Oh no offence meant, Vereker.

VEREKER
No offence taken, Melvill. (Taking the trophy from RAW).
To men who aren 't afraid to speak their minds.

RAW
Good luck, Sir

VEREKER begins to drink. Gradually, the officers join in with 
cheers of
encouragement until the entire Mess is chanting "Down, down, 
down". They
bang their fists on the table in time with the chants.

Gulping back the liquid, VEREKER stops as if he has 
accomplished his task.
The Officers applaud. General ad. lib. "Well done". Etc.

		VEREKER (Expressionless)
Not quite.
Turning the trophy upside-down, he pours a small amount of 
liquid onto the
floor. Appearing slightly intoxicated, his lips stained red 
with the wine, he
smiles:
The bottles of claret, are on me Gentlemen.

General calls of "Here, here".

RAW
Standing, he raises his glass to propose a toast:
The Regiment

OFFICERS
The Regiment

VEREKER
Still smiling, he wipes the remaining wine from the corners of 
his moustache.
The Regiment.

42.EXT. ZULUKRAAL. DAY

A tall, bald imposing Zulu named MANTSHONGA enters the camp. He 
makes
his way through a large regiment of young Zulu braves and older 
INDUNAS
(officers). They surround two young Zulu warriors who are 
tautly circling.
Their shields are held at the defensive, their assegais poised 
for underhand
thrust.

43. CLOSE SHOT - The two warriors fighting.

44. LONG SHOT - The vast crowd encircling the warriors.

45. The crowd cheers as CHIEF CETSHWAYO watches from his 
throne.
12

46.	MANTSHONGA, spotting CETSHWAYO, walks purposefully towards 
him.

MANTSHONGA
I bring greetings from your friends, the British, and from the 
Great Lord
ChelmsforJ

CETSHWAYO
Still watching the fighting Zulus;
And what do your Masters say?

MANTSHONGA
They are angry and send these demands. They say you rule in old 
ways
that are wrong, that you kill your people without triaL The 
Great White
Queen herself cannot kill her lowliest subject though she rules 
forty
lands, each greater than all ofZululanJ

BAYELE
Kill the Traitor, Father'

CETSHWAYO
Gesturing to his son to calm down:
I do kill, under the customs of the Zulu, and I shall not 
depart from that
Do I go to the country of the white man and tell him to change
his laws and customs?

MANTSHONGA
The British say your armies grow larger and they demand that you
disband your lmpis of War

CETSHWAYO
Tell the British I will not cross the river which divides our 
lands. But
ask Lord Chelmsford if he would disarm his warriors in the face 
of
such threats.

47.	CLOSE UP. The two Zulus are now in ferocious combat.

48.	SWITCH back to alternate CLOSE shots of CETSHWAYO & 
MANTSHONGA

MANTSHONGA
I will ask him  but his answer will be to start war against 
your 30,000
warriors.
CETSHWAYO
My armies will defend this land  

49.	General uproar as one of the fighting Zulus falls to the 
ground. Standing,
CETSHWAYO gives the signal to kill. The triumphant Zulu drives 
his assegai into
the other's heart. A group of warriors converge upon the body 
as MANTSHONGA
turns and EXITS.
13

50.	EXT. GARDEN. DIOCESAN MANSION. DAY.

A garden party is in full swing. There are tables and chairs 
dotted about a
spacious garden. Stringed music is playing and there is an air 
of English civility.
There are ladies with parasols, children playing and Officers 
present.

51.	FANNY COLENSO -25, her cheeks aflame, her manner excitable, 
is engaged in a
sedate' game of cricket with some children and officers. She 
bats the ball some
distance away near COL. DURNFORD.

FANNY
Anthony (Shouting)... Anthony

COL. DURNFORD, engaged in conversation with an Officer and a 
lady, turns
on hearing his name. He spots the ball.

		COL. DURNFORD (Handing his hat to the Officer)
Hold this.
Picking up the ball, he gives it to a little girl who has run 
to collect it.
(Smiling at FANNY) Well batted  Well batteJ

FANNY curtsies in mock recognition. Her eyes flash to his and 
we sense their
secret feeling for each other.

52.	VEREKER & two other officers ride along the drive to the 
mansion. Dismounting
VEREKER hands the reigns of his horse to a well-dressed black 
groomsman and
steps forward extending his hand in greeting to the black 
butler.

VEREKER
Joseph, how are all the Colenso girls?

JOSEPH
They are all in the garden, Sir And they will be glad to see 
you, I'm
sure.

VEREKER walks down the slope of the lawn, past a young girl on 
a swing, her
maid is in attendance. Removing his hat, he spots FANNY being 
bowled to by
LT. MILNE. Creeping up behind her, VEREKER indicates to MILNE 
to bowl
high.

		VEREKER (catching the ball MILNE has just bowled)
You tipped id Youtippedit! Out! Out!

FANNY
I did not (Turning) William. (Hugging him) You cheat, you.

VEREKER
Me cheat? Same old Fanny. (He kisses her on the cheek).
14

FANNY
With genuine affection: Welcome. Welcome back.

Taking his arm, FANNY & VEREKER walk across the lawn. VEREKER
throws the ball back to the cricketers.

53.	DURNFORD, still engaged in conversation, turns smiling. His 
smile fades as he
spots FANNY with VEREKER.

DURNFORD
Excuse me, Ladies. Leaving them, he makes towards FANNY &
VEREKER.
	54.	FANNY
		Did you get your farm going?

Yes, I did.

Oh.	How was it?

I've never been so happy.
VEREKER
FANNY

VEREKER

FANNY
Stopping, FANNY addresses him earnestly: I'm sorry you had to 
leave.

55.	DURNFORD approaches them.

DURNFORD
You 've met the... Honourable William Vereker, I believe.

FANNY
Yes Anthony, we were childhood friends.

DURNFORD
Your childhood friend shot a dead cow at the gallop the other 
day.
(FANNY laughs). He wasn 't impressed.

56.	SWITCH TO MANSION VERANDA.

CHELMSFORD watches the threesome as BARTLE FRERE approaches him,
puffing on a cigar.

CHELMSFORD
There is a Mrs. Dumford, is there?
15

BARTLE FRERE
She exists.. .but er. . .nothing '5 been heard of her, the 
eight years
Durnford's been in Africa.

CREALOCK
Although much is spoken of her now, My Lord.

These three walk along the veranda.

BARTLE FRERE
I, er, recommended him to you.. .because he knows Africa so 
well.

CREALOCK
Oh indeed. His ability to recruit native contingents is proving 
invaluable
to His Lordship.

BARTLE FRERE
How do you rate him as a soldier?

CREALOCK
It is widely held that he has great courage and he's an 
excellent
engineer

BARTLE FRERE
(Walking down the veranda steps). Shall we join the guests?

57.	The DEWITT sisters, both in their whites, are seen playing a 
game of tennis. They
are being watched by LTS. MELVILL & COGHILL (They are both 
seated). One of
the ladies moves off court to fetch the ball that has gone out 
of play. She glances up
at COGHILL.

COGHILL
Do you think she might be interested in  someone?

MELVILL
Which one?

COGHILL
Well that one. The one who keeps looking at me.

MELVILL
ft could be you flatter yourself CoghilL It's that odd eye.

LT. RAW approaches

		RAW (Tongue-in-cheek)
They must have locked all the good ones up.

58.	BARTLE FRERE, CHELMSFORD & CREALOCK have now joined a 
selection of
the guests at some tables on the lawn for afternoon tea.
16

MRS. DEWITT
Ah, General. (She curtsies. CHELMSFORD acknowledges). Do you
find our Border Country congenial, My Lord?

CHELMSFORD (Sitting)
The landscape, most congenial Ma'am  but the Border, 
vulnerable.

MRS. PRETORIOUS (Also sitting)
Do you really think Cetshwayo will attack us?

DURNSFORD, VEREKER & FANNY have also joined the party.

CHELMSFORD
The intention of the Zulu Impis and their King concern me 
deeply,
Ma 'am.

FANNY
Cetshwayo has no intention of attacking Natal, Mrs. Pretorious. 
Unless
he '5 given no option. He has no quarrel with us. (She sits).

BARTLE FRERE (Sitting next to FANNY)
It's very rare to meet a young lady interested in tactical 
matters, Miss
Colenso. Is it not, Sir Henry, most rare?

MR. PRETORIOUS
You are talking of a violent and murdering barbarian who 
commands an
army of 30,000 warriors just across the river

FANNY
My father has known and lived with the Zulus for many years.

MR. PRETORIOUS
Cetshwayo massacred 20,000 of his own people to make 
himseifKing.

COLENSO
The English Tudor Kings did no less. Much later in our nation 
'5 history,
I might add, and the French much more recently.

CHELMSFORD
That may well be, Your Grace, but be that as it may, my duty is 
clear
The defence of all this (indicating the surroundings) NataL

COLENSO
Yes, well, it's difficult to stand against that position. if 
you speak only
of . (Leaning forward & looking him in the eye).. defence.

MR. PRETORIOUS
And what does our good Colonel Durnford think?
17

DURNFORD (Walking around the tables to join VEREKER)
if the people ofNatal wish to feel safe, let them persuade 
their husbands
and sons to volunteer We need both Officers and men.

CHELMSFORD
We do Colonel, good point.

COLENSO
I cannot be brought to believe that Cetshwayo wants a war with 
Britain.

BARTLE FRERE
Every Zulu is raised to be a warrior Without a war there 'd be 
no Zulu
nation.

MRS. DEWITT
Nobody is really safe, are they Your Excellency?

JOSEPH has appeared at BARTLE FRERE's side. He whispers 
something into
his ear.

LADY FRERE
Mrs. Dewitt has four daughters, Henry, and Ifear she feels for 
them alL

59.	VEREKER has wandered away from the tables. He is watching 
MELVILL &
COGHILL chatting to the two DEWITT girls who were previously 
playing
tennis.

VEREKER
Your daughters may indeed be in some danger Mrs. Dewitt, but 
not at
the moment from the Zulus, Ifear
	60.	The parties' attention is drawn to the four on the lawn.
	61.	CLOSE UP of MRS. DEWITT as she laughs politely.

62.	As the camera swings back to the four on the lawn we see 
MANTSHONGA in
the background. The camera follows him ending in CLOSE UP as he 
strides
forward to meet BARTLE FRERE. BARTLE FRERE looks grave as if he 
is
already aware of the news he is about to hear.

63.	SWITCH, LONG SHOT to where BARTLE FRERE, CHELMSFORD,
CREALOCK & MANTSHONGA are now standing. BARTLE FRERE
addresses the entire garden party.

BARTLE FRERE
Ladies and gentlemen, your attention, please.

64.	LONG SHOT of lawn. The guests move forward.
65.	The camera closes in on the four on the veranda. With one 
arm behind his back,
a cigar in his other hand, BARTLE FRERE continues:
18

BARTLE FRERE (Slowly and deliberately)
I think I should inform you that I am obliged to issue a state 
of war
between Her Majesty's Government and the Zulu King, Cetshwayo

66.	SWITCH to CLOSE UP of VEREKER & COLENSO. General background
noises of dismay as BARTLE FRERE carries on.

67.
BARTLE FRERE
  on his non compliance with the ultimatum made on him urging
reformation...

68.	CLOSE UP of FANNY & DURNFORD. He drops his head, averting 
her gaze.

69.	CLOSE UP of BARTLE FRERE. He continues:

BARTLE FRERE
and redress for violations of British Sovereignty.

The guests applaud as CHELMSFORD & BARTLE FRERE shake hands.

70.	CLOSE UP of FANNY & DURNFORD.

FANNY
why? Why do men think ofnothing but killing? (She touches his
disabled arm lovingly).

Tucking his hat under his arm, he looks into her eyes and 
kisses her hand.
Walking away, he replaces his hat and reaching the top of the 
veranda steps,
turns. They exchange desperate, painful glances.

71.	CLOSE UPofCOLENSO

		COLENSO (To himself)
This wondeiful land we are privileged to share. (Removing his 
glasses.)
Dear God (hanging his head) there should be room for all of us.

72. EXT. CHELMSFORD'S CAMP. PIETERMARITZBURG. NIGHT

ASSORTED CLOSE SHOTS TO COVER THE MOVE TO RORKE'S DRIFT
- WAGON WHEELS CREAKING AS THEY TAKE THE FIRST STRAIN OF
MOVEMENT, OXEN HOOVES STARTING FORWARD ON RUTTED DIRT
SURFACES, WAGONEERS FLICKING WHIPS, PACKS GOING ONTO
BACKS OF SOLDIERS, BARE FEET OF NATIVE LEVIES, OFFICERS
MOUNTING, THEN SIMILAR DETAILS TO SHOW RHYTHMIC
FORWARD PROGRESS, MARCHING, ROLLING DARK SILHOUETTED
FORMS. TORCHES.

73. THREE OFFICERS stand watching:
19

OFFICER
There goes Number Two Company.

74.	Q.S.M. BLOOMFIELD CUTS ACROSS SHOT he is studying a list 
attached to a
clipboard. He is about to walk past a tent when he hears a call 
of "I'll see yer"
coming from within. Suspecting gambling, he moves to 
investigate.

75.	Pulling back the tent flap reveals a group, including 
BOY-PULLEN playing a game
of cards.

BLOOMFIELD
Do I believe what me eyes see? The whole bleedin' Army movin' 
off to
meet the murderin' heathen and what goes on in 'ere? A game 
ofBrag.
(Sterner) Brag?

BOY-PULLEN (Standing)
I'm sorry, Quartermaster

BLOOMFIELD
You'll be more sorrier still when the Zulu ask Lad.. "What 'ave 
you got
to offer me not to slit your gut?" and you say (Pointing to the 
cards in
BOY-PULLEN's hand) ah, the Knave of Hearts, Sir, the Knave of
Hearts.

The rest of the group chuckle.

Offering BOY-PULLEN a coin, BLOOMFIELD gives the order "Move!"

Taking the coin BOY-PULLEN leaves the tent.

76.	SWITCH to BANDSTAND. A band is playing "Men Of Harlech".
CHELMSFORD & BARTLE FRERE move into CLOSE UP in foreground.

CHELMSFORD
For a savage as to a child, chastisement is sometimes a 
kindness.

BARTLE FRERE
Let us hope then, that this will be the final solution to the 
Zulu problem.

77.	EXT. COLUMN ON THE MOVE. NIGHT

BOY-PULLEN moves against the traffic towards the back of the 
moving
column. He passes squads of torchlighted marchers, artillery 
units, riders,
wagons, until he comes to the SUTLER'S wagon.
78.	THREE SOLDIERS ENTER SHOT and surreptitiously help 
themselves out of the
back of the moving wagon. Noticing, BOY-PULLEN seizes his 
chance and
grabbing a bottle out one of the soldier's hands, makes a dash 
for it.

SOLDIER
'Ere! Come back 'ere you thievin' little beggar~
20

79.	MOVING SHOT. CHELMSFORD, on foot salutes an officer as 
DURNFORD
approaches from behind on horseback.

		DURNFORD (Calling)
My Lord. (CHELMSFORD turns.) I've prepared a list of ideas for 
you
to see. (He removes a paper from his tunic).

CHELMSFORD
Excellent. Thank you. (He continues to walk away) Give them to
Crealock, would you?

DURNFORD
My Lord. (CHELMSFORD turns again) This list was prepared for
you. I don 't think another can understand its true value.

CHELMSFORD (Taking the list)
Thank you Colonel Durnford. (He exits as DURNFORD looks on).

80.	CHELMSFORD joins his group of officers. He mounts his horse 
and then addresses
them:

CHELMSFORD
Gentlemen, within ten days we shall cross the Buffalo River and 
British
soldiers will then be in Zululand. Colonel Durnford will remain 
down
river  

81.	CLOSE UP of DURNFORD. He looks agitated by this remark.

82.	Undeterred, CHELMSFORD continues:

CHELMSFORD
  where he will be responsible for the defence of the Natal 
border
Turning his horse and without looking at DURNFORD he leads his
Party off

83.	BLOOMFIELD is joined by BOY-PULLEN

BOY-PULLEN
Will you hear "Last Post", Sir?

BLOOMFIELD
I listened extra careful to your "Stand To" this mornin', Boy. 
ft was
peifecL I couldn't 've done it better meseif, not even when I 
was Bugler
to The Duke Of Wellington.. .now tell me, where did you get 
that black
eye?

BOY-PULLEN
From the Cook, Sir They saw me dip your shaving tin in the 
tea-water
this morning, made their tea taste of Lifebuoy toilet soap, 
they saij
Handing him the bottle of gin he purloined earlier.
2t

BLOOMFIELD
So, you got it in the line of dooty.. (Taking a swig from the 
bottle &
handing it back to BOY-PULLEN)... point taken.

BLOOMFIELD gets up onto a wagon as BOY-PULLEN gulps from the 
bottle.

BOY-PULLEN
Will we be fighting the Zulus soo~, Quartermaster? (Joining
BLOOMFIELD, he jumps up onto the front of the wagon).

BLOOMFIELD
Could be. (He shouts for the wagon to move out) Across the 
river into
Zululand. (They share the bottle of gin). They might just be 
waiting
there for us to show up... .them stabbing assegais pointing 
right at our
bellies!....

BOY-PULLEN
You afeared of the Zulus then, Quartermaster?

BLOOMFIELD
One Zulu is only one man.. ..and I'm afeared of no one man... 
but the
Zulu, they come in the thousands.... like a black wave of 
death.... in the
thousands.... and them assegais.... stabbing!

The BOY-PULLEN doesn't answer. He stares into the darkness, 
contemplating
the prospect of the morning as described by BLOOMFIELD.

84.	Back in the centre of the camp, VEREKER rides past the 
bandstand to meet
DURNFORD.

DURNFORD
Your orders, Mr Vereker?

VEREKER
I'm to take the Sikali with the main column to the river

DURNFORD
Lord Chelmsford seems to want me to stay back with my Basutos.

VEREKER
I think Chelmsford wants a good man on the border Why he fears a
flanking attack and requires a steady Commander in reserve.

		DURNFORD (Angrily)
The wrong side of the river! The wrong place! (DURNFORD glares 
at
VEREKER, who realizes he has hit a raw nerve.) Does he wish me 
to
fight the Zulu, or merely observe their natural habitat?

Sensing his cue to exit, VEREKER salutes and saying "Sir" turns 
his horse to
join the Sikali who are leaving the camp.
22

85.	DURNFORD walks his horse a few paces forward as he watches 
the troop leave.

		DURNFORD (With sincerity)
God go with you, Mr Vereker (He turns his horse about as the 
band
music swells to its conclusion).

86. THE CAMP AT RORKE'S DRIFT. THE BORDER WITH ZULULAND. DAY.
TRAVELLING P.O.V.

THE THREAT OF THE BACKLIGHTED LANDSCAPE BEFORE THEM,
THE SUN GLARE MAKING CLARITY OF VISION DIFFICULT. CAMERA
PANS UP RIVER. THE MOUNTED INFANTRY CROSS TO THE FAR
BACK, THE UNION JACK HELD PROUDLY ALOFT.

87. RIVER BANK.
Two punts, carrying redcoated soldiers are being hauled across 
the water by
rows of Basutos on the opposite bank.
As they unload, the soldiers immediately form into columns.

88.	The first ox-wagon is driven out of the river, with much 
shouting and
encouragement from the drover and watching soldiers. There is 
general activity
everywhere.

89.	LOW SHOT. The wheels of the wagons and the Basuto's feet are 
seen trudging
through the slop of mud.

90.	LONG SHOT OF CAMP. A column of Basutos is seen walking 
towards the camp.
The white tents are dominant in the background.

91.	SWITCH to CHELMSFORD, seen mounted on horseback. He surveys 
the
proceedings through a pair of binoculars.

92.	CAMERA PANS to discover VEREKER, on horseback, leading the 
troop of
SIKALI HORSE across the river.

93.	CAMERA PICKS UP a calm LT. RAW as he crosses amidst the 
multitude.

94.	CLOSE UP of VEREKER. With gritted determination he spurs his 
horse onward
up the bank.
95.	SOT. WILLIAMS is seen seated upon a covered wagon about to 
enter the water.
PTE. WILLIAMS is on foot trying to instruct the animals.

PTE. WILLIAMS (Pushing one of the animals from the rear)
Come on ox.

SGT. WILLIAMS
Out! Not the ox's arse, you bloody idiod

(PTE. WILLIAMS returns to pushing the side of the wagon).
23

Get 'em in line!

(PTE. WILLIAMS loses his footing, slipping into the water. He 
is fully
immersed).

PTE. WILLIAMS
Serg' ah, I'm drowning Sergeant.
(He stands and we see that the water only comes up to his 
knee).

SGT. WILLIAMS
Williams, what the bloody 'ell do you mean by 'aving the sante 
name
as me?

PTE. WILLIAMS
Sorry Serg' (He struggles onward through the water).

96.	COGHILL & MELVILL are seen crossing.

97.	More oxen cross.

98.	A column of redcoats carrying rifles are seen striding 
onward. The SIKALI
HORSE ride past in the foreground.

99.	WIDE ANGLE. Both sides of the river are seen. Redcoats climb 
the hill in the
foreground. Everywhere seems more settled.

100.	CAMERA again picks up the SIKALI HORSE. They ride across 
screen in
CLOSE FOREGROUND to reveal a stationary VEREKER on horseback.

NORRIS-NEWMAN rides towards him. He has a red 
claret-and-port-drinker's
face and is wearing civilian bush-clothes including a huge 
bush-hat.

NORRIS-NEWMAN
Do you think Cetshwayo will send a party to greet you, Mr 
Vereker?

VEREKER (Calmly stroking his horse)
Oh they're here alright. We just have to make sure they don't 
get back
to announce us.

NORRIS-NEWMAN
You mean you've seen them?

Without answering, VEREKER turns his horse towards the hills. 
Breaking into
a gallop, he shouts the command:

VEREKER
Forward Sikali!

NORRIS-NEWMAN watches through his binoculars, then turns his 
horse back
towards the camp.
24

101.	EXT. RIVERBANK OPPOSITE RORKE'S DRIFT. DAY

CLOSE UP of CHELMSFORD. We see the view through his binoculars.
He is watching NORRIS-NEWMAN enter the camp.

CREALOCK approaches on horseback. They exchange salutes.

CHELMSFORD
What's that strange name the newspaper chap's called?

CREALOCK
Er, called Noggs, Sir Actual name is Norris-Newman. He presented
credentials from "The Standard".

CHELMSFORD
Our runners bare his dispatches, do they not?

		CREALOCK (Smiling)
Of course, Sir

They exchange knowing looks and turn their horses about towards 
camp.

102.	EXT. SWITCH TO RIVER. CLOSE TO CAMP - RORKE'S DRIFT. DAY.

A long line of NATAL NATIVE COMPANY is transporting wooden 
boxes of
ammunition on their shoulders across the river. V.0. of a 
brusque NCO is
heard:

NCO
		Come on lads, it's only a river! (The NCO is seen in CLOSE UP 
in the
foreground).

103.	LIEUTENANT COLONEL HAMILTON-BROWN, a rough kishman, and old
campaigner joins in:

HAMILTON-BROWN

104.

105.
Come on you piss-arse lot, get these bastards across. It's only 
water
Come along you idle scum, let's 'ave yer
HAMILTON-BROWN rides away as we see a native fall into the 
water under
his burden.

CHELMSFORD and his Company cross the river.

NATAL NATIVE COMPANY is seen again, still struggling across the 
river.
The NCO's VOICE is heard:

NCO
  I'll 'ave your guts fer garters!
25

106.	On the far bank CHELNISFORD and his Company are seen riding 
to meet
NORRIS-NEWMAN.

CHELMSFORD
An historical moment, Gentlemen.

NORRIS-NEWMAN
Excuse me, My Lord. (Introducing himself) Norris-Newman, of "The
Standard", My Lord.

CHELMSFORD
1 saw you lead our Cavalry sir

NORRIS-NEWMAN
Indeedldid, MyLord. Itwas one ofthe first to cross.

CHELMSFORD
Were they in good heart as they entered enemy territory?

NORRIS-NEWMAN
They spurred onto high ground, My Lord, full of spirit and 
looking for
the Zulu. Full of sport they were, My Lord.

CHELMSFORD
Tell what you see. Write it well, Sir, and make sure you get it 
right

NORRIS-NEWMAN
If I've got it right, My Lord, you lead an invasion into 
Zululand, for I see
it all around me, but "why?" is the question my readers will 
ask.
"why?"

CHELMSFORD
Do not confuse yourse{fi Why? We must strike a heavy blow. This
cannot be a war of manoeuvre.

NORRIS-NEWMAN
So attack is your defence. Well let's hope Cetshwayo will offer 
his Impis
full destruction.

CHELMSFORD
My only fear is that the Zulu will avoid the engagement

He turns his horse about and his Company follow as 
NORRIS-NEWMAN looks
on in amazement.

107.	CAMERA PANS to follow CHELMSFORD and his Company as they 
ride to
the foot of the hills.

108.	We see the view through CHELMSFORD's binoculars. He spots 
VEREKER
with the SIKALI HORSE.
26

109.	NORRIS-NEWMAN has caught up with CHELMSFORD:

NORRIS-NEWMAN
I have it, My Lord, we attack for sport - or is it reputations?

		CHELMSFORD (Lowering his binoculars)
Enough of your politicking, Noggs.

NORRIS-NEWMAN
I know your views on the usefulness of the Press, My Lord, but 
the
Englishman back home wants to know what his Regiments are 
doing.

CHELMSFORD (Resuming his gaze through the binoculars)
Then I trust you will tell him exactly what you have observeJ

110.	QM BLOOMFIELD pulls a drowned Basuto from the river onto 
the bank. He
removes the man's ammunition belt.

LT. HARFORD approaches. He is on horseback.

BLOOMFIELD
Look at that waste. Five rounds ruined Mr HaiforJ Each round has
to be accounted for.

		LT. HARFORD (Referring to the BASUTO)
It's terrible. Quite dreadfuL Something must be done.

BLOOMFIELD (Standing)
If they'd been put back in their boxes (moving towards 
Harford). Boxes
banded and screwed down proper like, as His Lordship ordered, 
nothing
would have happened to them, Sir

LT. HARFORD
I'm talking about our drowned Natives, Quartermaster!

BLOOMFIELD
Natives is not on my invoices, Mr Haiford. . ammunition is, and 
'as
to be accounted for. and the brass cartridge cases returned.
111.	In disgust, LT. HARFORD turns his horse about. He meets 
HAMILTON-
BROWN at the top of the bank.

LT. HARFORD
Several of our Natives went under Shouldn 't we have a Rolicall
Colonel?

HAMILTON-BROWN
Not practical, lad.. .we haven 't had time to make up the rolls 
yet
Besides, I'm not sure how many we had before the crossing.

HAMILTON-BROWN canters away.
27

LT. HARFORD follows reluctantly, not enthralled by this show of 
callousness.

112.	A Zulu recognisance party is seen atop the ridge. They view 
the scene
below.

113.	VEREKER and the SIKALI HORSE ascend the ridge.

114.	The infantry - the Twenty Fourth Foot -~fan out in 
sections, alert to possible
attack, and make for the high ground.

115.	CHELMSFORD's party rides by below.

116.	One of the Zulu's fires a warning shot into the air.

117.	VEREKER halts his company, as does CHELMSFORD.

118.	The guilty Zulu's voice booms out from above:

why do you come to the land of the Zulu?

119.	LT. MELVILL turns about in his saddle to address 
CHELMSFORD.

MELVILL
May Ianswer, Sir?

CHELMSFORD
By all means, Mr. Melvill.

MELVILL (Moving his horse forward a few paces, he bellows a 
reply)
We come here by the Orders of the Great Queen Victoria. Queen 
of all
Africa.

There is a moment of silence:

		VEREKER (Gives the order)
Forward!
120.	MELVILL turns to face his Redcoats.

MELVILL
Company, advance!

121.	Turning to a member of his party:

CHELMSFORD
Major, send the troops.

122.	There is a steady advance up the hill. The Zulus turn, 
scrambling through the
undergrowth.
28

123.	The SIKALI approach. One of the Zulus turns and stands his 
ground. He
thrusts his assegai at his foe dismounting the SIKALI from his 
horse. In a
second the Zulu jumps astride the horse but his escape is 
prevented by an
offending shot from another SIKALI.

124.	More SIKALI advance. They bring down several more Zulus.

125.	A group of four Zulus converge on one SIKALI. They pull him 
off his horse
into a crop of rocks. One Zulu manages to mount the horse and 
rides away
encouraged by the others.

VEREKER notices this. Slowly and deliberately he removes his 
rifle from his
saddle, takes aim and then fires. The dead warrior falls to the 
ground.

126.	A group of LANCERS track one ZULU. The lead LANCER 
approaches,
guiding his horse expertly. He feints with the downstroke of 
his lance.

The ZULU lowers his shield.

The LANCER, on the ZULU now, uses the up-stroke to impale the 
ZULU to
a tree.

NOGGS rides near the incident.

127.	CHELMSFORD has surveyed the incident through his 
binoculars.

128.
MELVILL (to Noggs)
Well done, Sir.. did you see, that Noggs? He deceived him with 
the
up and took him with the down.

		NOGGS (Studying the deceased Zulu from his horse)
Well, well this one's a grandfather at least if he'd been a 
Zulu in his
prime, I'd have given odds against your Lancer, Mr MelIvilL

129.	CHELMSFORD returns his binoculars to their case.

CHELMSFORD
Welt, Gentlemen, first blood to us and a rousing good report in 
the
newspapers to satisjy the politicians, eh?

130.	EXT.CAMPATRORKE'SDRIFT. DUSK.

Camp-fires are seen and the sound of neighing horses are heard 
as the
CAMERA follows a small troop of horsemen and wagon cross the 
river. The
CAMERA pans towards the sunset as the "Last Post" is heard.

131.	EXT. CETSHWAYO'S KRAAL. FIRST DAWN
29

The ROYAL IMPIS squat as they listen to their King. Huge, 
powerful,
glowering. He holds the royal trident spear in his hand as he 
strides before them.

CETSHWAYO
My warriors, our people are hungry. We must gather the crops 
that
will feed us through the Winter But first we must defend our 
lands...
from those who would steal the fruits of our labours. The 
British have
broken their promise.. and crossed the Buffalo River into our 
home-
lands. We must fight to survive.

A huge hissing sound comes from the multitudes. Assegais thrust 
to the sun
red sky. CETSHWAYO points westward.

CETSHWAYO
We must kill!

ALL ZULUS
Usutu... Usutu... Usutu.. ("Kill")

132.	Black outlines against the rising red sun, assegais and 
shields rattling, the
Zulus hail their King, pledging loyalty to the death.

133.	LONGSHOT. EARLYMORNING.

The full splendour of the mountain can be seen through the 
mist. The country,
wide-rolling, is beautiful, but empty.

134.	The camp is silent. ALL men's eyes are towards the mountain.
CHELMSFORD, seated, views the sight through his telescope. 
CREALOCK
& PULLEINE are close by.

MELVILL approaches on horse-back. He addresses PULLEINE:

		MELVILL (Saluting)
We 're ready to move out, ColoneL

		PULLEINE (Addressing CHELMSFORD)
My Lord, we're prepared to move armour to er 

CHELMSFORD
Your destination, Colonel?

PULLEINE
		Um Isil'... (He has difficulty pronouncing the word)

		CREALOCK (With exact pronounciation)
Isandhlwana. Four miles further than that tallest hilL Follow 
the
track and it will lead us to the slopes of the mountain.
30

		PULLEINE (With quiet contemplation)
Isandhlwana. ..yes....

		CHELMSFORD (Leaning away from his telescope)
Isandhlwana.

135.	THE ARMY PREPARES TO MARCH JNLAND FROM THE RIVER.

136.	CHELMSFORD'S army, with ox-wagons seven-abreast, comes to 
life and
proceeds to lumber noisily toward the peak.

137.	MELVILL'S company of REDCOATS, guarding the left flank of 
the
wagons, marches, rifles at the ready. Platoons move tactically, 
one section
of each platoon is always in a defensive position.

138.	Tension everywhere. Drovers glance anxiously upwards. Empty 
of visible
signs of the enemy, the hills are no less threatening.

139.	MELVILL (on horseback) approaches the lead wagon driven by
BLOOMFIELD & BOY-PULLEN.

MELVILL
I want your wagons in an extended line, Quartermaster, but not 
too
extended, or my Company can 'tprotect them. No more than fifty 
feet
between each one.

BLOOMFIELD
Sir~

MELVILL returns to the flank

		BLOOMFIELD (To BOY-PULLEN)
if they're too close together, the stupid things 'ii walk into 
each other
and you can sit on your arse for a good four hours.
Turning about on his seat he addresses the train under his 
command:

BLOOMFIELD
Come on lads, keep them wagons moving. No more than fifty feet
Keep 'em moving. Keep 'em moving.

140.	COGHILL, stationary, astride his horse watches the 
movement.

COGHILL (Addressing MELVILL)
There Melvill, there stretched out is my Lord Chelmsford '5 
Army.
(Spurring his horse onward) What a wondeiful adventure we
undertake. What a marvellous spree.

COGHILL & MELVILL break into a canter.
31

141.	VARIOUS SHOTS OF THE INCESSANT MOVEMENT FORWARDS.

142.	SHOUTS, COMMANDS, THE MOVE INTO ZULULAND has started with
urgency.

143.	EXT. ZULULAND EAST OF ISANDHLWANA. HOT SUNNY DAY.

FANNIN, a short, fat English settler, in his thirties, 
gross-featured, rides
sleepily over sloping terrain. Behind him, on foot, several 
black African
retainers follow desultorily. FANNIN snorts, sweats, appears 
generally
fat and unhealthy. He halts his horse and removes a bottle from 
his saddle-
bag. He takes a large swig from the remaining liquid and 
discards the
bottle.

144.	FANNIN reaches the top of an animal track at the top of a 
ridge. Looking
down he spots several ZULUS herding a small group of cattle. 
The ZULUS
shout calls of alarm.

145.	Turning around to give orders to his retainers, FANNIN 
spots them scrambling
down the slope away from the ZULUS.

146.	As FANNIN returns to face front, he gapes as he notices 
that the valley is
black with ZULU IMPIS. They are run-marching towards the west. 
No
noise save the disciplined swish of thousands of feet in the 
dust.

147.	FANNIN hesitates, realizes he's been spotted, quicky, 
cruelly jerks his
horse's head round and spurs over the ridge into the next 
valley.

148.	UHAMA calls out and MBILINI, BAYELE & another, with UHAMA, 
sprint
up the ridge in pursuit of FANNIN. As they mount the crest, 
they see FANNIN
belting down the far side in search of safety. UHAMA stops the 
other three
momentarily from continuing the chase.

UHAMA
Follow the white Man, let him see you. He will lead you to the
soldiers. Then, let the white Soldiers take you. When they think
they have broken you  tell them that the Impis are in the East

149.	EXT. ZULULAND NEAR ISANDHLWANA. DAY.
The three Zulus set off in pursuit of FANNIN.

Riding desperately, FANNIN, his mouth open in fear and his 
shoulders
heaving with effort, drives his tired horse over the rough 
country.

FANNIN peers about. Huge pistol in his hand, he spots MBILINI 
and fires.
MBILINI 'dies' dramatically, but when FANNIN rides on, MBILINI 
comes
to life, grinning and joins the others to track FANNIN.
32

150.	VEREKER and SIKALI appear beyond the next ridge. Spotting 
FANNIN,
VEREKER gives the signal to advance.

151.	FANNIN reaches VEREKER's party.

FANNIN
Zulu  Zulu!  

FANNIN droops in his saddle, too tired to talk. He manages to 
dismount.

		VEREKER (Offering a drink from his hip-flask)
Here.

FANNIN
I'm ill.. dozens of Zulus followed me. I must have shot five, 
six, ten,
I lost count. They just kept coming. Blood curdling swine.

152.	VEREKER looks down the slope at the three Zulus who have 
now been
apprehended by the SIKALI. FANNIN drinks again. His avid, greedy
behaviour does not enamour his rescuers.

VEREKER
Why did they attack you?

FANNIN
I discovered their Army, Your Honour  a valley full of them  and
beyondt

VEREKER
Army? what Army?

FANNIN
Beyond them hills, Sir   and coming this way.

VEREKER surveys the area. The terrain is empty.
153.	A concealed Zulu scout watches stolidly at the distance 
reduced figures below.

ST
154.	THE CAMP AT ISANDHLWANA. 21  JANUARY. 6.OOPM

CHELMSFORD's party ride into camp.

155.	PULLEINE is seated at a table outside his tent. He is 
smoking and studying a
document as SGT. MURPHY pours red wine into his tankard. VEREKER
crosses in front of the table.

PULLEINE
Officer Vereker, er, would you mind me asking you to take a 
look at
this map?
33

		VEREKER (Returning to the table)
By all means, ColoneL

PULLEINE
You see  

156.	The ELDERLY & YOUNG BOER seen earlier approach PULLEINE

ELDERLY flOER
Your wagons, Colonel 

PULLEINE
What about my wagons?

ELDERLY BOER
On an open slope like this, you must bring your wagons round and
form them into a laager  and do it immediately

157.	CHELMSFORD and his lancers arrive at PULLEINE's tent. 
CHELMSFORD
dismounts and addresses PULLEINE.

CHELMSFORD
I hear you have prisoners, Colonel, well done. (To Vereker) Good
evening, William.

PULLEINE
Thank you, Sir

VEREKER
Good evening, Frederick. I think you should hear this. (To 
elderly
Boer) You were saying your brother didn 't laager his camp 
right?

ELDERLY BOER
They had seventy-three in their party. We found seventy-three
skeletons six months later

		CHELMSFORD (After a moment's reflection)
Boers require to laager with only afew wagons, we have many. An
unassailable square of British firepower is a defence which can 
be
Jbrmed in a moment  

The BOERS start to move away.

CHELMSFORD
You're leaving us Master Boer?

The ELDERLY BOER turns

ELDERLY BOER
I'm going to camp among the rocks over there.
34

The BOERS exit.

PULLEINE (Addressing Chelmsford)
My Lord, Mr Fannin, er (Picking up and referring to the map)
claims to have seen the Zulu Impis, some few thousand or so, in 
this
valley.

CLOSE UP of map location.

CHELMSFORD
Unlikely (Using his riding crop as a pointer) most unlikely. It 
would
mean taking 24,000 men over mountain tops. This is not helpfuL
Have the prisoners brought to my camp.

158.	EXT. BATTLEFIELD ISANDHLWANA. EVENING.

The three Zulu prisoners are tied to two wagons. A CORPORAL is
administering a serious beating to BAYELE.

VEREKER approaches.

		VEREKER (Indicating to cease the punishment)
Alright CorporaL Anything?

CORPORAL
No sir, no.

VEREKER turns to the prisoner at the other wagon.

VEREKER
Be sensible man, tell us.

The prisoner maintains his silence as VEREKER walks away in 
dismay.

159.	REDCOATS and NATAL NATIVE SOLDIERS, in their separate 
quarters,
clean their rifles, carefully oiling the barrels and working. 
VEREKER
passes RUSSELL busy oiling the elevating mechanisms on his 
rocket tubes.

RUSSELL (To Vereker)
Good evening. (Referring to the job in hand) Dirty work, eh?

VEREKER (In reply)
Very dirty. (To himself) Very dirty.

160.	INT. CHELMSFORD'S TENT.

CHELMSFORD is seated. PULLEINE and CREALOCK stand behind him.
FANNIN is standing to one side beside the desk. VEREKER 
converses with
two of the prisoners in Zulu.
35

PULLEINE
What did they say?

VEREKER
Claim they're deserters from the main Impis in the East. 
Followed this
way so they could give themselves up, go home.

PULLEINE
Do you believe that?

VEREKER
Oh their bodies are well oiled. They 're fed regularly, but 
it's unlikely
they're the fugitives they say.

CHELMSFORD
Have them questioned further

VEREKER exits with the prisoners.

CHELMSFORD (Rising to address FANNIN at the desk)
They claim the Zulu Impis are East towards the Royal Kraal, and 
yet
this fellow says they are further towards the North. (He picks 
up the
map).

FANNIN
Wherever they are, Your Worship, there are sixty thousand or 
more

CHELMSFORD
They multiply, Mr Fannin. You do speak the Zulu tongue, do you?

FANNIN nods.

CHELMSFORD
And tomorrow I intend to find the Zulu Impis, Mr Fannin, and you
will accompany me.

FANNIN
Er, I'm no soldier, Your Honour, and it 's further into 
Zululand.

CHELMSFORD
You will accompany me, Mr Fannin, or you will be arrested. (He 
gives
PULLEINE a glance as an indication to dismiss FANNIN)

PULLEINE
This way, Mr Fannin.

CHELMSFORD
Crealock We have scouts out in the direction he claims he saw 
the
Zulus?
36
CREALOCK

CHELMSFORD
Of course, Sir.
And?

CREALOCK
The only reports of enemy activity have come from the direction 
of the
Royal Kraal, at Ulundi.

CHELMSFORD
Thank you.

CREALOCK exits as CHELMSFORD continues to study the map.

161.	BOY-PULLEN stands on top of a wagon gazing at the sunset.
BLOOMFIELD is checking stores. BOY-PULLEN clambers down and 
walks
over to BLOOMFIELD.

BOY-PULLEN
Why don 't the Zulus attack?

BLOOMFIELD
Zulu may not wear shoes or trousers and the like but it don 't 
mean to
say they got no brains. They'll watch us  and wait  and find our
weaknesses.

Studying his clipboard, BLOOMFIELD crosses into foreground.

BOY-PULLEN
Have we weaknesses, Quartermaster?

BLOOMFIELD does not answer. He strides forward out of shot. BOY-
PULLEN turns, places his bugle to his lips & plays "The Last 
Post".
162.	EXT. ZULULAND EASTOFBUFFALO NIGHT.

The camp is quiet - but wakeful at the imminence of battle.

BLACKNESS.

163.	PTE. WILLIAMS is on sentry-go. There are men seated around 
a camp fire,
PTE. STOREY sits on the back of a wagon, smoking. PTE. WILLIAMS
stares into the black night. Insect noises, a horse neighs. He 
hears something
more alarming. His eyes widen, his grip on his rifle tightens. 
He listens again.
He moves to the front of the wagon, convinced he has heard 
something.
Returning to the rear he addresses STOREY.

PTE. WILLIAMS
What was that, Storey?
37

		STOREY (Leaning forward)
What? Piss off I never heard nothing. (After a moment's 
reflection)
I don 't think.

PTE. WILLIAMS
Well I did. Stand To. (He positions his rifle at the ready).

Tutting, STOREY throws his cigarette to the ground. He stands, 
reluctantly.
The others do not move.

		PTE. WILLIAMS (In a forced whisper to the others)
Stand To!

Ignoring him, all but one remain seated. One other has lit a 
torch from the fire.

164.	This PTE. proceeds to SGT. WILLIAMS' tent.
PTE.
Stand To, Colour Sergeant.

		SGT. WILLIAMS (From within his tent)
Who gave the order?

Private Williams, Sir
PTE.
		SGT. WILLIAMS (Emerging from his tent)
I've gotta see this.

165.	SGT. WILLIAMS has reached the wagon. PTE. WILLIAMS is still 
aiming
his rifle into the blackness.

SGT. WILLIAMS
Did you call 'Stand To', Private Williams?

PTE. WILLIAMS nods, still listening.

STOREY
I didn 't hear nothing, Serg'.

SGT. WILLIAMS looks at STOREY. His face shows complete contempt 
for
PTE. WILLIAMS. Then he hears something also. It is the 
approaching sound
of horses hooves.

		SGT. WILLIAMS (With sudden urgency)
Well Stand To!   damn you!

PTE. WILLIAMS takes out his bayonet and attempts to fix it. 
SGT.
38

WILLIAMS lays a hand on his arm as if to replace the bayonet 
back in it's
scabbard.

SGT. WILLIAMS
No. You've done well fer once. Don 'tpush yer luck!

PTE. WILLIAMS (He continues to attach his bayonet)

Iheard 'em first
SGT. WILLIAMS (With sarcasm)
I'll get you a medal for modesty, Private Williams, would you 
like
that?

PTE. WILLIAMS
You never would, Colour Sergeant A medal?

166.	There are loud noises of advancing bodies coming directly 
towards them.
From the blackness:

DURNFORD (V.0.)
Colonel Durnford here.

		SGT. WILLIAMS (To PTE. WILLIAMS)
Easy, lad.

As DURNFORD and his escort of fifty mounted BASUTOS approach, 
SGT.
WILLIAMS salutes.

SGT. WILLIAMS
Just follow the track, Sir, you '11 come to Lord Chelmsford '5
Head Quarters.

		DURNFORD (Spurring his horse onward)
Sergeant
SGT. WILLIAMS
Get down, lads.

The line of sentries relax, unfix their bayonets and most 
proceed to return to
their sleeping bags.

PTE. WILLIAMS is deflated almost to the point of tears.

SGT. WILLIAMS
You done welL Keep it up laJ Keep it up.

A smile reappears upon PTE. WILLIAMS face. He resumes his watch 
with
renewed enthusiasm.

167.	INT. CHELMSFORD'S TENT NIGHT.
39

CHELMSFORD is seated on his bed. DURNFORD stands before him
distressed, blinking at his commander's verbal assault.

CHELMSFORD
You intended to bring your reserves across the river?

DURNFORD
I have received intelligence from, sources of my own that the 
Zulu
Impis are moving North of here and threaten your left.

CHELMSFORD
Intelligence? Sources of your own? Did it not occur to you they
may be native rumours? Rumours to draw you off- to leave the
whole ofNatal open to a possible counter thrust

		DURNFORD (After a beat)
Cetshwayo wants a head on battle. A decisive victory, so that 
his
people can get on with the one battle that is life and death 
for his
Nation - a delayed harvest

CHELMSFORD
Are you dictating the strategy of this war, Sir?

DURNFORD
I'm explaining my reasons.

CREALOCK enters the tent.

CHELMSFORD
Yes?

CREALOCK
A large party of Zulus have been sighted in the direction of 
the King's
KraaL
Getting up, CHELMSFORD moves over to look at the map on his 
desk.

168.	CLOSE UP of map as CHELMSFORD picks up a pair of dividers 
and
measures the distance between Isandhlwana and Ulundi.

169.	CHELMSFORD turns to face the two men.

CHELMSFORD
Tomorrow we will continue our advance on Ulundi. Dumford,
kindly return to your unit Bring them here immediately to
support Pulleine. Mr Vereker will join you as ADC. Do you
understand me clearly?

DURNFORD
And the threat of counter invasion no longer exists?
40

170.

171.
Colonel, if on another occasion you flout my direct orders I 
shall
reluctantly relieve you of your commanJ

DURNFORD exits in silence. CREALOCK walks over to the map.

CREALOCK
Perhaps he has thought to conquer Zululand on his own, My LorJ

CLOSE UP of CHELMSFORD as he nods in silent agreement.

THE CAMP AT ISANDHLWANA. 22N9 JANUARY. 7.OOAM.

Reveille is heard. CHELMSFORD emerges from his tent with 
VEREKER.

CHELMSFORD
CHELMSFORD
I trust you to keep me well informed of Colonel Durnford and 
his men
when they arrive William.

VEREKER
Certainly Frederick.

CHELMSFORD mounts his horse.

CHELMSFORD
Gentlemen, we move to find camp and engage the enemy, and my 
nose
tells me that we may make early contacfl

CHELMSFORD and his party move out. VEREKER looks on.

172.	PULLEINE is stationary, astride his horse. MELVILL 
approaches on
horseback.

PULLEINE
Mr Melvill, until the reinforcement arrives we will Stand To.

MELVILL
Sir (Riding off, he addresses a Bugler) You there. Sound "Fall 
In".

173.	As CHELMSFORD'S COLUMN moves out, the camera pans away up 
to the
hills to reveal a hidden Zulu Scout.
The rear units are half-a-mile from the camp.

174.	Below, the camp prepares for immediate battle  activity 
everywhere.
Redcoats line up, buckling on their packs and pouches.

175.	PULLEINE, MELVILL & COGHILL, all on horseback, are engaged 
in
conversation.
41

PULLEINE (To COGHILL)
Huge expanse to keep an eye on. (Referring to Nqutu Range) Would
you mind riding over to Stuart Smith & asking him to bring his
artillery about?

COGHILL
Sir (Riding off)

PULLEINE
Oh, Mr Melvill, kindly send a lookout Tell him to call out the
instant he spies Colonel Durnford's Column coming to reinforce 
us.

MELVILL departs.

176.	COGHILL arrives at STUART SMITH's area.

COGHILL
Stuart?

STUART SMITH
Yes.

COGHILL
How quickly can you move your artillery forward?

STUART SMITH
Well, my horses are feeding, as you may observe, Mr Coghill. 
It'll
take a little while.

COGHILL
Well, fed or hungry, Pulleine wants them in position 
immediately. (He
departs).

STUART SMITH
Right. (Addressing one of his men) Bombardier, to me please.

177.	CLOSE UP of a concerned looking PULLEINE.

178.	Various shots of CHELMSFORD'S COLUMN moving forward.

l'79.	CLOSE in on CHELMSFORD as he rides to meet NOGGS (NORRIS-
NEWMAN)

CHELMSFORD
What o'clock is it, Mr Noggs?

NORRIS-NEWMAN
Eleven o'clock, My LorJ
42

CHELMSFORD
Our friend Colonel Dumford will be  should be   at this minute
approaching Pulleine. I think we'll eat here. I want to scout 
that
mountain top and be back with an appetite in one hour. (He turns
his horse about).

CREALOCK
Sir

180.	DURNFORD'S ARRIVAL AT ISANDHLWANA.
22ND JANUARY. 1 1.OOAM

DURNFORD'S COLUMN pounds down the slope into the camp. It is
welcomed with relief, tension everywhere relaxes and smiles are 
seen. There
is calling and greeting between the forces.

181.	AREA BETWEEN WAGONS.

BAYELE and the OTHER ZULU CAPTIVE held for questioning are tied 
up
to wagons in an area somewhat screened from the camp. MBILINI 
is on
the ground, his feet and hands are bound.

TWO SENTRIES guard them. MBILINI lies almost unconscious, tongue
lolling, from the ropes that bind him. Evidence of the beating 
he has
undergone is extensive.

The TWO REDCOAT SENTRIES run forward to see DURNFORD'S
COLUMN arrive, momentarily leaving the captives.

		BAYELE (To MBILINI with whisper)
My brother  We must warn our King. I will call the white
soldier back. Can you still move to help me?
MBILINI nods.

		BAYELE (Shouting)
Guard. Guard!

The TWO SENTRIES turn. One addreses the other:

SENTRY
I'llfix 'im, Serg'

He starts to walk back to the wagons. BAYELE continues to 
shout.

SENTRY
Shut that yellin' up, you 'ear me! (He reaches the wagons) Did 
you
'ear me? Shut up!
43

As he passes MBILINI on the ground, the warrior thrusts his 
trussed legs
between the SENTRY'S legs. The SENTRY stumbles to the ground, 
his
head near BAYELE'S feet. He immediately starts to rise but 
before he can,
BAYELE has lifted his powerful foreleg waist high in stamping 
position and
brings it down with a sickening crunch onto the SENTRY'S lower 
neck.

Now all is desperate speed. Under BAYELE'S directions, MBILINI
stretches to the unconscious SENTRY and manages to take his 
bayonet
with his bound feet.

182.	INTERCUT WITH SHOTS OF DURNFORD'S ARRIVAL IN CAMP.

183.	Cutting the ropes about his neck, MBILINI suceeds in rising 
to his feet,
managing to get the bayonet blade to BAYELE'S bonds.

Between them the first ropes are cut.

As BAYELE'S hands are freed, the SENTRY on the ground starts to 
regain
consciousness. Taking the bayonet from MBILINI, BAYELE thrusts 
the
weapon into the SENTRY'S back killing him. He removes the 
bayonet
from the SENTRY'S body and also takes a knife from the redcoat's
scabbard which he hands to MBILINI. Together they free the 
third Zulu
tied to the other wagon.

Making their escape, they edge beyond the wagons. Crouching 
low, they
run up the slope and head for the North.

184.	But all British eyes are to the East or on DURNFORD'S 
column.
DURNFORD dismounts, takes in the encampment.

PULLEINE
Exceedingly pleased to greet you, Sir

DURNFORD
ColoneL I see you're 'Standing To.' Perhaps the men could eat 
with
their equipment unbuckled.

PULLEINE
Oh yes, of course. Excellent idea, good. Oh, Mr Melvill, order
"Stand Down", will you?

MELVILL
Sir~ (He turns his horse about)

PULLEINE
Please. (Indicating that DURNFORD follow him)

PULLEINE & DURNFORD walk out of shot as MELVILL is seen in the
background.

44


MELVILL
Sergeant Stand the men down would you.

185.	8 MWES EAST OF ISANDHLWANA. ROAD TO ULUNDI.
22ND JANUARY. 1145AM.

186.	CLOSE UP of pencil drawing in progress. The artist is 
revealed as being
CREALOCK. His composition is of a stationary wagon.

187.	NOGGS observes. Glass of claret in hand, he makes his way 
towards
CREALOCK.

NOGGS
Crealock, old fellah (Sitting beside him). I'm doing notes for 
my
dispatch and I need to clear up afew military points. I don 't 
want
to bother His Lordship. Had it drummed into my thick skull that
a good Commander never willingly splits his forces, especially 
in
an enemy's country   before knowing their dispositions.

CREALOCK has continued to sketch throughout Noggs' banter.

CREALOCK
Ah, Yes, if we were facing a European enemy armed with guns I
think your point would hold, Noggs. Further, may I remind you
I do not create the strategies you wish to comment on. I am only
his Lordship's Secretary. (He gives NOOGS a smug smile).

NOGGS
With a slight chuckle he leans closer to CREALOCK.
I wouldn 't take overly comfort from that Crealock old fellah  
because if~he sinks, then you sink with him.

NOGUS departs, as CREALOCK looks up for a moment and then 
continues
with his drawing.

188.	EXT. PULLEINE'S H.Q. TENT. ISANDHLWANA. DAY.

DURNFORD, VEREKER & PULLEINE are seated. They are dining 
together.
The occasion is incredibly civilised. The table is laid with a 
white linen cloth,
silver cutlery, condiments and wine glasses containing claret.

		DURNFORD (Toying with the wine in his glass)
So, you 've been asked to look after me, Lieutenant?

VEREKER
Well I assure you, Sir, I have no desire to create 
difficulties.
45

DURNFORD
And I assure you, you do not In fact I'd be obliged for your 
best
advice. What have your scouts seen?

VEREKER
So far only their scouts. But we have had reports of a small 
Impi
farther north, over there. (He turns to indicate the area to 
his left)

PULLEINE
His Lordship is of the certain opinion that it 's far too 
difficult an
approach to be chosen by the Zulu command.

		DURNFORD (Looking to the North)
Yes, welt Difficulty never deterred a Zulu commander.
(Returning his gaze to VEREKER) How many?

VEREKER
We don 't know.

DURNFORD (After a moment's reflection)
I think it would be wise to picket the hills. Just in case.

VEREKER rises and collecting his hat, exits to carry out 
DURNFORD' S
instruction. DURNFORD returns to his meal.

189.	EXT. NQUTU PLATEAU DAY
MOVING SHOT. DURNFORD rides out alone.

190.	VEREKER, S.M. KAMBULA, OFFICERS and a troop of SIKALI horse
ride out of camp into the foreground.

191.	CAMERA PANS the vast African countryside. VEREKER' S column 
is
seen in the distance. CAMERA stops to reveal a ZULU SCOUT in 
the
foreground. He is hidden by a tree. On spying the soldiers, he 
turns to
two young ZULU BOYS behind him. He shouts instructions that they
draw attention to themselves by moving their herd of cattle.

192.	DURNFORD, now with KAMBULA, reaches the top of a rise. He 
stops
and KAMBULA hands him a pair of binoculars. Surveying the land 
he
spots VEREKER'S column. Handing the binoculars back to KAMBULA, 
he
spurs his horse onward.

193.	VEREKER'S COLUMN come over a rise to see the cattle being 
urged to
the lip of the plateau.

		RAW (Pointing to the cattle)
There's steak on the hoof Sir.

		VEREKER (Pausing for a moment)
Sikal4 forward!
46

Kicking their horses and whooping, the soldiers give chase. The 
ZULUS
try to flee but in vain. One soldier, TROOPER JAMES, aims his 
rifle at
one of the ZULUS and fires.
VEREKER, hearing the shot, rides towards TROOPER JAMES, but 
stops
when he gets to the ZULU BOY who is lying motionless on the 
ground.
Dismounting, VEREKER goes over to the body and looks down at 
the dead boy
with compassion.

194.	TROOPER JAMES spurs to the lip, exultant, keen to kill. He 
reins his horse
abruptly. Holding it still, he stares at the valley before him. 
Suddenly all
energy leaves his body. He stares in disbelief. LT. RAW is 
beside him.

JAMES (Calling, his voice unbelieving)
Mr. Vereker! Mr. Vereker! Come and look at this, Sir!

		VEREKER (Riding into shot he addresses JAMES)
You 've just managed to bring down a boy of twelve.

JAMES does not respond. He stares straight ahead. Following his 
gaze,
VEREKER spots what James has found before him.

195.	EXT. WATERHOLE. VALLEY NEAR ISANDHLWANA. DAY.

The valley they overlook is filled with Zulus, Cetshwayo's main 
Impi.
Close-packed, sitting in silence, covering the whole of the 
valley floor
and perching on every inch of its rising sides, are twenty 
thousand warriors.

They have found the long sought main IMPI.

		VEREKER (Utter disbelief)
My God, we 've found them.

196.	EXT. NQUTUPLATEAU. DAY
SILENCE

VEREKER, RAW & JAMES stare down at the Zulu Impis.

197.	EXT. VALLEYNEARISANDHLWANA. DAY.

The Zulus look up. BAYELE, who stands apart, looks first at his 
warriors,
then up to the English. He shouts the order to advance. 
Chanting, the Zulus
rise and start to clamber up towards the plateau.

198.	EXT. NQUTU PLATEAU. DAY

		VEREKER (Still stunned, he addresses RAW)
Warn the camp. Tell ChelmsforJ Inform His Lordship we 've
found what he's looking for.
47

		RAW (Turning his horse about)
Yes, Sir.

VEREKER orders his troop to line up facing the Zulu.

VEREKER
Sikali, forward!

The mass of Zulus have started to cover the North strip of the 
plateau.

VEREKER
Fire!

More and more Zulus mount the crest coming into formation. The 
troopers
are amazed at the sheer weight of enemy number.

VEREKER'S troop fire volleys steadily, the Zulus now six 
hundred yards
away. Some Zulus fall but the mass, getting into disciplined 
ranks,
advance implacably towards them.

VEREKER gives the order to retreat.

VEREKER
Retire! Rerire!

VEREKER'S troop retreat as the ZULU follow.

199.	INT. PULLEINE'S H.Q. TENT. ISANDHLWANA. DAY.

PULLEINE is seated at his desk. He is writing a letter. He 
looks up as he
hears distant gunfire.

200.	EXT. PULLEINE'S CAMP. ISANDHLWANA. DAY.

BLOOMFIELD walks through the kitchen area. He stops and looks 
to the
hills as he too hears gunfire.

201.	INT. TENT. ISANDHLWANA. DAY

BOY-PULLEN, STOREY and another are having a game of cards. BOY-
PULLEN looks up, alert. He too has heard something. STOREY 
nudges
him.

STOREY
Oy! Goon. What'redoin'?

BOY-PULLEN dismisses his concern and continues with the game.

202.	INT. MELVILL'S TENT. ISANDHLWANA. DAY.
48

MELVILL is seated, relaxed, his feet up on his desk. He is 
drinking from
a tankard. Another officer lies reclined, smoking. On hearing 
gunshots,
MELVILL jumps up, running outside the tent.

MELVILL
Don 't tell me the Zulu managed to get up there after alt

203.	EXT. CAMP. ISANDHLWANA. DAY.

LT. RAW rides into shot.

RAW
Zulu!

204.	MOVING SHOT. CAMERA follows RAW as he rides up to PULLEINE'S
tent and dismounts.

RAW
They're here.

PULLEINE emerges from his tent.

RAW
I've sent to Lord Chelmsforct
PULLEINE

Bugler. Sound "The Alert".

BUGLER runs into foreground. CLOSE UP as he sounds "The Alert".

205.	PTE. WILLIAMS is feeding the horses. On hearing the "The 
Alert" he jumps
to attention running out of shot. After a beat he returns to 
collect his helmet
which is positioned on top of one of posts.

206.	BOY-PULLEN & STOREY emerge from their tent. There are troops
scramblingeverywhere. V.0. Fall in! At the double!

Heavy artillery moves into and out of shot.
207.

208.

209.
PULLEINE & MELVILL, both on horseback, watch the proceedings.

EXT. BATTLEFIELD. ISANDHLWANA. DAY.

SGT. WILLIAMS is rallying a Company of Redcoats.

SGT. WILLIAMS
Wheel 'em in! wheel 'em in! Wheel 'em in! Come on now. Tighten
those ranks!

COGHILL, on horseback surveys the ranks from the rear.
49

210.	A young BOY-SOLDIER walks in front of the redcoats. He 
carries an
armful of markers. With him is STOREY.

SGT. WILLIAMS
Private Storey. Get those markers pegged out at the double.

STOREY
Serg'!

SGT. WILLIAMS
One every 'undred yards 

STOREY (To Boy Soldier)
Come on boy, scamper.

SGT. WILLIAMS
  and Bugler, make sure he pegs 'em in a straight line - towards
the enemy!

211.	RUSSELL & his men with a group of Natal natives run forward 
to position
the rockets.

		RUSSELL (Through clenched teeth as he works)
Hold them  please God  three minutes  please hold them!
(With increasing urgency) Come on, come on, come on. Come on 
men!

212.	STOREY is pacing out the markers on the battlefield. The 
BOY SOLDIER
follows him.

STOREY
Ninety two, ninety three, ninety four, ninety five, ninety six, 
ninety
seven, nighty eight, ninety nine  (Coming to a standstill) 
What's
next, boy?

BOY SOLDIER stands motionless. He stares towards the horizon.

STOREY
Oy.	You useless little bastard. Come 'ere. Scamper.

		BOY SOLDIER (Pointing behind Storey)
Look. Look!

STOREY turns to look.

213.	Vast masses of Zulus appear over the horizon. They are 
chanting, menacing
like a fast approaching swarm of bees.

214.	Closer shots of the Zulus as they approach. Their assegais 
poised high
above their heads at the ready.
50

215.	CAMERA PANS to the tiny white tents of the camp in the 
distance. The
small Company of Redcoats is seen before them and for the first 
time it is
obvious just how outnumbered they are.

216.	EXT. ZULULAND EAST OF ISANDHLWANA. DAY.

CHELMSFORD & CREALOCK admire the pleasant surroundings. They
walk towards a canopied dining area. Servants have prepared a 
magnificent
table. Silver dishes, polished beautifully and gleaming in the 
hot sun, are
carried from a small field kitchen behind a screen.

CHELMSFORD
Splendid site, Crealock, splendil I want to establish Camp here
immediately.

CREALOCK
Certainly, Sin

Standing around the table are several officers including 
HAMILTON-BROWN,
HARFORD & MILNE. NOGGS is also present. As CHELMSFORD sits, so 
do
the others.

HAMILTON-BROWN stands apart, drinking uneasily.

CHELMSFORD
After lunch, Brown, I want you to return to Isandhlwana and 
instruct
Colonel Pulleine to join us here immediately.

HAMILTON-BROWN (Downing the contents of his glass)
If you '11 excuse me, My Lord.
CHELMSFORD
No appetite, Colonel? (He indicates to a nearby servant to 
refill his
glass).

HAMILTON-BROWN
My men haven 't eaten since yesterday and there won 't be any 
supplies
until I get them back to Isandhlwana.

CHELMSFORD
Well they can start off now and you can join them when you've 
eaten.

HAMILTON-BROWN
Kind of you, My Lord. But I don't think it would be proper for 
me to
sit at your table while they're with their bellies stuck to 
their
backbones.

EXITS.
51
		HARFORD (Rising to leave)
Excuse me, Sir.

CHELMSFORD
Learn nothing from that Irishman, HafforJ
behave.

HARFORD
Yes, Sir.

Except, how not to

General ad. lib. Smug laughter, banging of cutlery on table and 
cries of
"Here, here".

217.	Solitary SIKALI HORSEMAN approaches Chelmsford's camp.

218.	RETURN to dining table. The meal is now over. CHELMSFORD 
cuts the
end off a cigar with a silver cigar-cutter. NOGGS is peeling an 
apple with
a silver fruit knife.

CREALOCK walks into shot. He speaks in CHELMSFORD'S ear.

CREALOCK
A strange message from Vereker, My Lord. It would seem Pulleine
has a battle on his hands. No details. No intelligence.

CREALOCK resumes his place at table as CHELMSFORD turns to the
others.

CHELMSFORD
Mr. Milne. Kindly take your telescope to a high point Note the
events at Isandhlwana.

MILNE
Sir. (He leaves).

CHELMSFORD also rises and leaves the table.

219.	CLOSE-UP of CREALOCK, then NOOGS. They both share a sense of
foreboding.

220.	CHELMSFORD walks slowly and deliberately towards an empty 
wagon. He
goes to the front and leaning against the front panel, lowers 
his head. He
wants to be alone.

221.	EXT. BATTLEFIELD. ISANDHLWANA. DAY.

SHOTS OF THE ZULU ARMY. They stand, chanting, beating their
weapons against their shields, ready to attack.
52

222.	CAMERA PANS BACK to reveal the vast enormity of the ZULU 
army in
comparison to the small Company of Redcoats.

223.	VARIOUS CLOSE-UPS of kneeling Redcoats, poised, rifles at 
the ready.
Their faces reveal the terror of the reality before them.

224.	There is a uniform, disciplined, victorious shout from the 
ZULU IMPI:

ZULU iMi'i
Usutu... . Usutu!

Only three hundred yards away, the Zulu Impi advance, vastly 
outnumbering
their enemy ahead.

225.	CLOSE-UP OF PTE. WILLIAMS. Extremely nervous, he looks to 
SGT.
WLLIAMS for reassurance.

SGT. WILLIAMS removes a ceremonial sash from his inside pocket 
and
places it defiantly over his tunic. He winks at PTE. WILLIAMS 
who
returns to face the Zulu with renewed confidence.

226.	DURNFORD leads his column onto the battlefield. 
Dismounting, the
Company takes up it's positions and commences to fire a volley.

		DURNFORD (Still on horseback)
Steady men. Steady. Steady now.
(Addressing one of his men) Sergeant

SGT.
Yes, Sir.

DURNFORD
Ride to Lord Chelmsford. Ride toward Ulundi. Tell him the 
battle he
longs for has started and he needs to move here quickly. 
Quickly.

Yes, ColoneL
SGT.

227.	CAVAYE'S AND MOSTYN'S COMPANIES

The last echo of the "Stand To" is heard. RUSSELL'S men fire a 
rocket and
then another. They sail erratically over the heads of the ZULU 
IMPI. The
third, however, finds it's target and strikes at the centre of 
the advancing
warriors.

228.	STOREY and BOY SOLDIER run forward hurriedly trying to 
position
their markers.

STOREY
All right, this '11 do. (Stopping, he hands BOY SOLDIER his 
rifle)
Here, grab that.
53

229.	The Zulus are now uncomfortably close. BOY SOLDIER stands
transfixed.

BOY SOLDIER
Master.

		STOREY (Realizing the close proximity of the enemy)
Oh, bugger that. (He throws the,markers to the ground and 
seizing
BOY SOLDIER'S hand runs back towards their own lines).

230.	Still fifty yards away, STOREY & BOY SOLDIER drop to the 
ground as their
own Companies fire a series of volleys in their direction.

As the Zulus begin to drop, STOREY & BOY SOLDIER seize the 
opportunity
and return to their feet, again running forward.

As another volley is fired, STOREY & BOY SOLDIER again drop to 
the
ground.

STOREY
Somebody's not watching our bloody markers. (Getting to his 
feet)
Come on, Sunshine.

STOREY attempts to help BOY SOLDIER to his feet. The boy's body 
is
limp, sprawled and bleeding. He has been shot in the head.

STOREY
Oh no. (Bitterly) Come all this bloody way to get shot by a 
bullet
from Birmingham. (Shouting to his own lines) Shoot straight, you
bastards!
STOREY takes the boy's hat and runs quickly forward as the 
ZULUS advance
over the inert body.

231.	The ZULU LEFT HORN is close at hand. RUSSELL works with his
Bombardier and artillery men to set up the rockets, but they 
are losing the race
with time.

RUSSELL
Fire one. Fire two.

RUSSELL, recognising the uselessness of his rockets at this 
point of the
battle, draws his sword. He orders his bombardier and small 
troop of
artillerymen to line up and face the Zulu. RUSSELL fights 
bravely, as do
his troop. It is a few dozen men against hundreds. They are 
inundated by
the ZULU tide, which is not checked. Several ZULU fall, but 
RUSSELL and
his troop are simply overcome and vanish as the LEFT HORN 
continues on its
way hence, threatening to cut Dumford's column off from the 
camp.

232.	PULLEINE, on horseback, spots the onslaught through his 
binoculars from
the camp. VEREKER rides to meet him.
54

PULLEINE
Reinforcement only. And ride to Stuart Smith. Let his guns cover
Durnford for a fall back.

VEREKER
Yes Sir. (Shouting) Sikali, follow me.

233.	VEREKER and his SIKALI troop leave the camp. PULLEINE 
watches
before returning to his binoculars.

234.	STUART SMITH commands the airning and firing of his seven 
and twelve
pounders. VEREKER rides up from the background.

VEREKER
You give me some covering fire for Dumford on the right flank.

STUART SMITH
Sir. Whole section RIGHT'

One of the big guns is brought about to fire at the line to the 
south which
attacks DURNFORD.

STUART SMITH
Fire!

235.	CLOSE ON DURNFORD. He watches in appreciation as the
big shells start to land amongst his attackers causing havoc.

DURNFORD
		Fire! (Recognising the hopelessness of the situation) Retreat!

236.	The companies wheel about to race back to the relative 
security of a nearby
donga.

There is sudden turmoil as a group of ZULUS hurtle over the 
lower edge of
the donga. A fierce hand-to-hand, assegai against bayonet 
battle ensues as
warrior after warrior rises from cover to come over the edge. 
DURNFORD
rides to make sure that firing against the rear line of ZULUS 
is maintained to
prevent it too from coming forward, to secure the temporary 
breech.

237.	SOLDIERS of CAVAYE'S COMPANY have withdrawn to the camp
periphery and now fire in line with MOSTYN'S COMPANY, volley 
after
steady volley.

COGHILL and MELVILL shout orders to the ranks.

COGHILL
Choose your targets men. That's right Watch those markers.
55

MELVILL
Keep steady. You're the best shots of the Twenty-Fourth. You
bunch of heathens, do it

238.	CAVAYE'S COMPANY LINES

SOT. WILLIAMS walks calmly behind the front line.

SGT. WILLtAMS
Present, Arms. Watch yer markers. Watch yer markers. Adjust yer
sights.

STOREY fires in the line. He searches through his pouches for 
rounds.

STOREY
I'm running out of bleedin' ammunition. (Calling over his 
shoulder)
Buglen'

BUGLER
What?

STOREY
More ammunition. Scamper!

BUGLER
I've bin twice already.

STOREY
You can go three times. It won 't do you any 'arm. Go on! Run
both ways.

The BUGLER runs towards the ammunition wagon, two hundred yards 
to
the rear. The line fire in volley, working the levers of their 
breech-loaders.

		COGHILL (Steadying his horse along the line)
Keep shooting.

		STOREY (To the soldier next to him)
Soft 'eaded buggers these. (Referring to the ammunition) 
Flatten out
against the bone. Smash 'em out

STOREY'S MATE
But bullets run out.. and those bloody spears don 't

239.	AMMUNITION WAGON.

BLOOMFIELD is labouring to open another tightly bound and 
screwed down
ammunition box while BUGLERS wait in a queue, restive.

BLOOMFIELD has to stand over the box and exert great pressure 
on the
screwdriver to force the oxidised screws out of their sockets.
56

BOY-PULLEN stands at the front of the queue. He is handing out 
one box of
ammunition at a time to each soldier.

A NATAL NATIVE reaches the head of the queue. As BOY-PULLEN goes
to hand him some ammunition, BLOOMFIELD looks up and strides 
forward.

BLOOMFIELD
Pullen! You will not issue ammuntion from this wagon to any but
authorised Companies. This lot can have their own. (He snatches
the box back from the NATAL NATIVE).

The NATAL NATIVE doesn't understand English but he understands 
what
BLOOMFIELD means. He voices his objection in Zulu.

BLOOMFIELD
Get to your own wagon.

The BUGLER sent by STOREY is waiting impatiently.

		BUGLER (Running to the front of the queue)
'ow long we gotta wait, Quartermaster?

BLOOMFIELD
Get back in line, boy. Wait your turn.

BUGLER
But Sir  

BLOOMFIELD
Move.
BLOOMFIELD returns to prizing open the boxes. BUGLER goes to 
return
to the end of the queue but turns back to plead with 
BOY-PULLEN.

BUGLER
Pullen?

BOY-PULLEN
Look it am 't my fault. All the tops are screwed down.

REDCOAT AT FRONT OF QUEUE
Come on. I'm waiting.

BOY-PULLEN gives the REDCOAT one box and then hurriedly hands 
the
other to STOREY'S BUGLER.

240.	FRONTLINE.

SGT. WILLIAMS
Present, Arms.
57

STOREY is beginning to panic. The ammunition situation is now 
becoming
desperate.

STOREY
Hurry up with that bloody amo

Increasing numbers are not firing. They glance back with 
impatience
towards the ammunition wagons, space4 five hundred yards apart, 
where
queues of BUGLERS and REDCOATS wait for rounds that are 
distributed
too slowly.

241.	EXT. ZULULAND. EAST OF ISANDHLWANA. DAY.

CHELMSFORD and his COLUMN move slowly and steadily from their
Camp towards the West. MILNE approaches on horseback to meet 
them.

MILNE
My Lord, I watched the camp for twenty minutes. The haze 
obscures
much. The tents have not been stuck. The only thing I could
distinguish is the wagons have been moved on mass into the 
camp.

CHELMSFORD
Thank you Mr. Milne. Inform Colonel Crealock, would you?

MILNE
Sir.

242.	CAMERA PANS away from CHELMSFORD'S COLUMN as we see an
OFFICER'S POV through binoculars. Angle changes as we see a 
rider enter
the camp and approach LT. HARFORD.

243.	CHELMSFORD'S HQ.

CREALOCK steps into a wagon. He turns to address MILNE who 
stands
outside.

CREALOCK
Thank you, Milne.

MILNE salutes.

HARFORD approaches urgently. He remains on horseback and talks 
to
CREALOCK through the open side of the wagon.

		HARFORD (Out of breath, agitated)
The camp is under attack from a large force of Zulu. Colonel
Pulleine sends for help.

CREALOCK
Calm yourself Mr. Haiford. Where do you come by this 
intelligence?
58

HARFORD
Durnford's Cavaye himself rode from the camp.

CREALOCK
Very well, go on.

HARFORD
Colonel Harness has already turned with the artillery.

		CREALOCK (The severity begins to register)
They have? I see. Ride after Lord Chelmsford and acquaint him 
with
your intelligence.

HARFORD has started but turns his horse about as CREALOCK 
calls:

CREALOCK
Mn Haiford. . control your passions. A professional soldier must
keep cool and thoughtful in times of stress.

HARFORD looks as if he is going to explode but controls his 
feelings and
rides after CHELMSFORD.

244.	EXT. BATTLEFIELD. ISANDHLWANA. DAY

VEREKER gallops hard as do his troop of BASUTO HORSEMEN.
CAMERA TRACKS FORWARD, following them to the donga which
DURNFORD'S COMPANIES are defending. Horses are in the donga.
The troops are firing from the outer lip of the donga.
VEREKER'S MEN provide the much needed backup.

DURNFORD
Good work, Mn Vereker.

DURNFORD spurs his horse forward. The situation is still 
desperate.

		DURNFORD (Shouting to his troops)
Prepare to fall back.

Line after line of ZULUS run forward to join the assault.

DURNFORD
Move the horses!

CLOSE ON DURNFORD. He signals the next tactic as he rides 
across the
donga. Commands are issued down the line. The men now disengage 
and
run in the opposite direction from the ZULUS, leaping into the 
donga to find
their horses and swinging onto saddles to scramble up the far 
side, galloping
400 yards close to the camp to form a new defence line.
59

"The Retreat" is sounded. There is hand-to-hand, bayonets, 
spears, hunting
knives and ZULUS trying to assegai the horses.

245.	A handful of REDCOATS await the ZULU as they clamber over 
the
ridge. Realization of the vast Zulu numbers suddenly dawns as 
their NCO
shouts in desperation:

NCO
Take the high grouncit

The REDCOATS are completely overwhelmed and are soon lost 
amidst the
ZULU onslaught.

246.	DURNFORD'S COMPANIES ride into camp. There are wounded
lying everywhere.

DURNFORD
Speed up the ammunition flow, Vereker. I'll try to hold the 
road to
Rorke '5 Drift.

VEREKER complies.

247.	Like a huge tidal wave, the ZULUS plough their way through 
the lines of
REDCOATS defending the outer perimeter of the camp.

		DURNFORD (Addressing S.M. KAMBULA)
Sergeant, come with me.
DURNFORD and S.M. KAMBULA depart as ZULU mercilessly stab at the
wounded already on the ground.

248.	SOT. WILLIAMS' MEN are under serious attack.

249.	The ZULUS are among the NATAL NATIVES, stabbing, stabbing, 
stabbing.

250.	The ZULU LOIN is sitting some three hundred yards from the 
battle, facing
away from it. The ZULU LOIN, two IMPIS of seasoned warriors, 
start to
run towards the gap through which the NATAL NATIVES, ZULUS and
SMITH'S GUNS are streaming.

251.	Both lines of REDCOATS are attacked from the back, and the 
lines try to
fight enemy in front and behind.

SGT. WILLIAMS
Fire. Fire. Close ranks. Retreat!

SOT. WILLIAMS, pistol in hand, sees the danger to the guns.

SGT. WILLIAMS
Save those guns.
60

SOT. WILLIAMS grabs a passing ZULU by the throat. He throws him 
to
the ground and beats him to death. Reaching the top of a ridge, 
he bayonets
a ZULU scrambling up the ridge towards him. Withdrawing the 
blade, he
turns just in time to bayonet another ZULU attacking from the 
rear.

SGT. WILLIAMS (Shouting & looking around desperately)
Private Williams!

		PTE. WILLIAMS (From just below the ridge)
Sgt. Williams!

SGT. WILLIAMS
Come 'ere. Get yourself up 'ere. (He grabs PTE. WILLIAMS' jacket
pulling him up onto the higher ground).

PTE. WILLIAMS (Struggling)
Sir.. .Ah!. . . Ah!

SGT. WILLIAMS
Comeon. Getup!

252.	SMITH'S GUNS are driven away.

SGT. WILLIAMS (Helping PTE. WILLIAMS to his feet)
You '11 get a medal yet, Private Williams.

At this point SOT. WILLIAMS falls to his knees. He has been 
assegaied
in the back. PTE. WILLIAMS thrusts his bayonet over SOT. 
WILLIAMS
head, killing the offending ZULU. He turns and bayonets another 
running
towards him.
SGT. WILLIAMS
Behind you, lad! Ah no... (He is struck again)

But it is too late. A single assegai penetrates PTE. WILLIAMS' 
back.
Both Sergeant and Private die together.

253.	CLOSE IN on BAYELE as he leads the ZULUS onward.

254.	CAMERA FOLLOWS THREE SIKALI HORSEMEN as they gallop
towards BLOOMFIELD'S ammunition wagon. Another GROUP OF
REDCOATS surrounds the wagon. BLOOMFIELD and BOY-PULLEN
serve them with ammunition which is fired with discipline at a 
rapid rate.

BLOOMFIELD
Wait your bloody turn. Wait your bloody turn and get in line.
(Handing a box to a young private) There you are, boy.

255.	LONG SHOT of the ZULUS streaming across the plain.
61

256.	Many of the REDCOATS have turned and are running for their 
lives. The
battleground is awash with red tunics. As the CAMERA passes 
over the
dead, one body suddenly leaps to his feet. It is PTE. STOREY. 
He has
been playing 'dead'. Running, he makes for cover beneath a 
wagon. He
searches beyond the mass of ZULUS for a target. He sees the 
distant
INDUNAS, he aims carefully and fires.

STOREY, satisfied with the result, now kneels to the corpse of 
a fallen man
beside him. He finds LT. CAVAYE dead. He bends to search him for
ammunition. STOREY finds one cartridge, spitting on it for 
luck, he loads,
aims and fires.

A huge line of ZULUS run forward and engulf him.

257.	CLOSE UP of STOREY'S torso beneath the wagon. An assegai 
protrudes
from his chest.

258.	SWEEPING SHOT. The ZULU LOIN is streaming into the camp 
through the
gaps in the north and north-east corner. The end is near.

259.	VEREKER and a trooper gallop towards BLOOMFIELD'S AMMUNITION
WAGON.

		VEREKER (To BLOOMFIELD)
Over here. Quickly.

BLOOMFIELD hands VEREKER a whole case of ammunition which he
passes to the TROOPER beside him.
VEREKER
Quickly, Trooper.

260.	VEREKER & TROOPER approach DURNFORD'S LINES with the
ammunition.

DURNFORD
Well done, Vereker. Now goodbye, lad.

The pair exchange glances.

DURNFORD
Go on.

After a beat, VEREKER turns his horse about and rides away.

DURNFORD
Sergeand

The Sergeant takes DURNFORD'S HORSE by the bit as DURNFORD
dismounts.
62

261.	CLOSE UP of the ammunition case as the men frantically try 
to open it
with their bayonets and rifle butts.

262.	CLOSE UP of DURNFORD. He is firing his pistol.

263.	CAMERA finds ELDER BOER in crowd as he is assegaied in the 
back.

The fighting is hand-to-hand, with a few REDCOATS having rounds 
which
they fire with discipline under the command of DURNFORD.

264.	COGHILL and MELVILL command the squad of REDCOATS who form
an approximate ring around PULLEINE'S tent. Some wagons have 
been
pulled forward to form a partial barricade. PULLEINE stands in 
the centre.
A BUGLER BOY holding the Regimental Colours is close by.

COGHILL & MELVILL ride up to PULLEINE.

PULLEINE
Well fought, Gentlemen. It's time to save the Colours. Get to
Rorke '5 Drift. You must warn them. (To BUGLER BOY) The
Colours.

PULLEINE takes the Colours from the BUGLER BOY and hands them to
MELVILL.

PULLEINE
Carry them to safety Mr. MelvilL

MELVILL
Sir.

COGHILL and MELVILL take the Colours, spur through the ZULUS
and head to the gullies and ravines that lead to the river. 
PULLEINE
watches, moves back into his tent.

265.	CLOSE UP of DURNFORD. He looks over his shoulder and then 
back
to the ZULU before him. He makes a decision and moves away from 
the front
line.

		DURNFORD (To S.M. KAMBULA)
Sergeant! Sergeant! Take my horse. Up you go.

S.M. KAMBULA is helped up into the saddle.

DURNFORD
Sergeant, you're to ride back to NataL When you see the Bishop
tell him (He pauses momentarily) that is, tell his daughter, I 
was
obliged to remain here with my infantry. Now go. God go with 
you.
63

S.M. KAMBULA
I leave God Jesus with you.

He leaves as CAMERA closes in on DURNFORD'S face.

266.	SMITH'S guns, at full gallop, sweep through the camp.

267.	VARIOUS SHOTS of the battle. The battlefield is covered 
with dead
ZULU and REDCOAT bodies.

268.	BLOOMFIELD'S AMMUNITION WAGON.

Some of the ZULUS have picked up burning brands from the 
cooking fires and
are setting the wagons on fire.

BLOOMFIELD & BOY-PULLEN jump down from their wagon, taking
some cases of ammunition with them.

Move it!

I'm trying.
BLOOMFIELD

BOY-PULLEN

They are only ten yards away when there is a massive explosion. 
The wagon
has burst into flames and the ammunition continues to explode.

269.	CLOSE UP of BLOOMFIELD. He is lying face down on the ground 
in a
state of shock. He slowly turns his head and we see the bloody 
corpse of
BOY-PULLEN. BLOOMFIELD'S face grimaces as he is stabbed in the 
back
by an unseen assailant. His face falls into the dirt.

270.	INT. PULLEINE'SH.Q.TENT. DAY.

PULLEINE is sitting inside his tent. He is writing a letter to 
his wife. There is a
pistol on the table.

BAYELE enters the tent. PULLEINE immediately picks up his 
pistol and
aims at BAYELE. There is a moment's hesitation from both. 
PULLEINE
drops his pistol to one side inviting BAYELE to kill him. 
BAYELE seizes
the moment and with one forward fatal thrust, stabs PULLEINE in 
the heart.

PULLEINE slumps onto the desk as BAYELE leaves without remorse.

271.	LONG PAN SHOT of MELVILL & COGHILL as they take the Colours
out of the camp.

272.	VEREKER is nearby as a ZULU leaps out, bringing MELVILL & 
his horse
to the ground.
64

VEREKER shoots the ZULU.

MELVILL gets up, hands the Colours to COGHILL and gets back up 
onto
his horse.

		MELVILL (To COGHILL, indicating the Colours)
Give them to me. (COGHILL does so) Come on. Come on!

They spur onward, COGHILL using his t)istol as they do so.

273.	MOVING SHOT. A gun carriage charges over the slope. As it 
does so,
the rear gunner is shot and the gun itself becomes disengaged 
from the rest
of the carriage tumbling down the slope.

274.	GUN CARRIAGE IN FOREGROUND. VEREKER, COGHILL &
MELVILL ride over this obstacle (SLOW MOTION) the Colours 
aloft.

275.	EXT. BATTLEFIELD. ISANDHLWANA. DAY.

HIGH VIEW. DURNFORD'S South-East defence position. ZOOM forward
to show the first refugees behind from the camp breaking out on 
the South,
crossing into the ravine; their line of exit the same as the 
guns, defended by
DURNFORD' S troops.

276.	CLOSE UP of DURNFORD. He loads his pistol and turning full 
circle,
realizes that he and his troops are surrounded. Jumping up onto 
an
ammunition wagon, he starts to target the approaching ZULUS, 
now only
ten yards away. He uses all six shots, throws his pistol to one 
side and picks up
a discarded assegai from the wagon. As he frantically tries to 
batter a ZULU
warrior, another ZULU aims a rifle straight at him.

There is a single shot. DURNFORD, clasping the shoulder of his 
disabled
left arm, falls off the ammuntion wagon and tumbles down the 
ravine,
landing at the bottom with a painful thud. Out of breath, he 
struggles to sit
upright, his back against the muddy bank of the ravine.

A ZULU appears at the top of the ravine. Standing on top of the 
ammunition
wagon, he throws his assegai down at the body below. It finds 
it's target,
piercing DURNFORD in the chest. Short of breath, he makes a vain
attempt at removing the weapon but his efforts are futile. He 
draws his last
breath and dies.

277.	EXT. FUGITIVE'S RAVINE. DAY.

COGHILL, MELVILL & VEREKER desperately fighting to control their
horses scrambling down the hazardous rocky terrain - quarry to 
the
pursuing relentless ZULUS behind them. REDCOATS on foot are
overtaken and dispatched with stabbing assegais.

278.	EXT. RIVER BANK OPPOSITE RORKE'S DRIFT.
65

COGHILL, MELVILL &VEREKER urge their horses onward, galloping 
into
the river.

Several ZULUS remain on the bank, shooting rifles and throwing 
assegais
into the water.

One ZULU jumps into the water and attempts to swim after them.

VEREKER is the first to reach the opposite bank. The other two 
have
become separated from their horses. VEREKER'S is close by. 
Scrambling
up the bank, VEREKER turns to COGHILL & MELVILL who are still 
in the
water.

VEREKER
For God's sake, hold them back! I'll get the horses.

COGHILL is the next to reach the bank. He turns back to MELVILL 
who is
struggling in the water with the Colours.

COGHILL
It's alright It's alright.

He helps MELVILL up onto the bank as VEREKER mounts his horse.
VEREKER rides off in pursuit of the other two horses.

There is a single rifle shot, which brings VEREKER'S horse to 
the ground.
In the background we see a vast number of ZULUS engulf COGHILL 
&
MELVILL. MELVILL attempts to fight with his sword but he is 
overwhelmed.
There is an awful piercing scream and the two men disappear.

279.	INTERCUT BETWEEN VEREKER & GROUP OF ZULUS.

VEREKER lies on the ground, his left leg trapped beneath the 
body of his
horse. He sees the ZULUS take up the Colours as they run up to 
the high
ground, revealing COGHILL & MELVILL' S dead bodies in the
FOREGROUND.

VEREKER is breathing uneasily. He watches with amazement as the 
ZULUS
hold the Colours aloft mockingly. Some ZULUS are wearing their 
purloined
Redcoat uniforms, they whoop and wail exultantly.

VEREKER takes his time. He aims his rifle at the ZULU carrying 
the
Colours.

The shot kills the ZULU and the Colours fall (SLOW MOTION) 
down, down
into the river.

Relieved, VEREKER' S head falls to the sandy bank.

280.	The Colours float into CLOSE UP.
66

281.	EXT. PULLEINE'S CAMP. ISANDHLWANA. DUSK.

CHELMSFORD and his ESCORT ride into the camp. The air is full 
of smoke
and the crackling of fire can still be heard. A dead soldier 
who has been tied to a
post and disembowelled is CENTRE SCREEN.

The wind begins to howl as CAMERA follows CHELMSFORD into the
centre of the camp. He dismounts. Very slowly he removes his 
helmet.

CLOSE UP of HARFORD. A solitary tear trickles down his cheek as 
he
surveys the area with disbelief.

Stationary, CHELMSFORD looks around him. Then very slowly and
deliberately he walks forward towards the CAMERA.

CAMERA PANS to reveal CREALOCK, still on horseback, in the back-
ground. He rides into focus.

CREALOCK
Excuse me, My LorJ There '5 something I must convey to you. 1
rode a little way along the track to Rorke '5 Drift. The sky 
above
is red with fire (Pause). Your Orders, My Lord? Do we move to 
the
Drift?

CHELMSFORD does not answer. He continues to walk forward,
expressionless.

TIGHT CLOSE UP. CHELMSFORD lowers his head, his eyes still 
front.

282.	CROSS FADE to blood red sunset. Script is superimposed:

The Battle of Isandhlwana was recorded in history as the worst 
defeat ever inflicted on a
modern army by native troops.

In Parliament, upon the downfall of his government, British 
Prime Minister, Benjamin
Disraeli, asked the question:

"Who are these Zulus, who are these remarkable people who 
defeat our generals,
convert our bishops and who on this day have put an end to a 
great dynasty?"

ZULU singing and chanting crescendos.

THE END

 
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