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The Thorn Birds movie 7 | The ticket to the Vatican

Quotes from film part 7

Coming along beautifully, Meggie. This time next year, you'll be ready for the horse trials at the Gilly fair. But then, Father, by this time next year, you could be in Rome. Poor little Hal. I think he's a mite feverish, Meggie. Mrs. Smith, please take the children in the kitchen for tea. You have heard the news? The Pope has decided that Australia should have its very own cardinal. I didn't know you stay current with church politics. But it's so intriguing, don't you think? His Holiness is sending a papal legate to search the length and breadth of this land to find a man worthy enough to wear the biretta. Now, that's like Cinderella. Mary, much as I love sparring with you, it's time we made a truce. A truce? The priest confesses. It's true I once had ambitions. Great ambitions which I thwarted by my own stupid lack of humility. Then I was sent here. Here you were. A good Catholic, with Drogheda and no heirs or so I thought. And you thought, "My ticket to the Vatican." Put with typical cruelty but perhaps not undeserved. The point is, I've changed and it's largely you I have to thank for it. Me? When you made the Clearys your heirs, you dashed all my hopes, as you intended. But it freed me, too, from all my old desires. Mary, I'm a priest. Only that. And content. Bravo, Ralph. I can't remember when I've enjoyed a performance more. "All my old desires." That is wonderful. I'll let you stew a while longer but your day of reckoning is coming. Don't you ever doubt it. How you do love the illusion of your own power. Don't make me pity you. Pity me? Do you doubt I can't make you writhe yet? Do you think I can't make you sell yourself like a painted whore before I'm finished with you? I don't doubt you'll try, but take care. In trying so hard to destroy my soul, you may lose your own. If there's still one there to lose. Or still one there to destroy! In a Christian country, all this commotion would mean rain. Those grazing lands are dry as chips. Not a mouthful of grass anywhere. I reckon we'll be lucky lads if this lightning doesn't set the range aflame. Did I ever really say Drogheda was heaven? Good night. Daddy, come on. Little Hal is very sick. It's very bad, Paddy. For God's sake, someone get a doctor! I phoned from Aunt Mary's. He's all the way out to Dibben-Dibben. Bob, get some more sulfur from the storehouse, will you? "May Christ receive thee who hath called thee "and may the angels bear thee unto Abraham's bosom." Meggie, what is it? I'm all right. But you're not. Just talk to me. There's nothing wrong. Leave me alone! She's doing it again, Father. She's been like this ever since little Hal died. I know. She won't talk to me, either. We can't let this go on. Meggie. Meggie, listen to me. You've got to stop this. I know how much you loved Hal, but you can't go on grieving this way. Meggie, please. You're wasting away before my very eyes. I can't bear it! Father, you make me so ashamed. It's not Hal. I mean, I do miss him, but What, then? Are you sick? I can't tell you. You can tell me anything. That's what I'm here for. I'm a priest and I love you just the way God loves you, wee Meggie. Father I'm dying. Dying? Just like Hal. Only it's some kind of tumor or something, Father. How do you know this, dear heart? I get the most awful pains, Father. And then, there's a lot of blood. But it's not all the time. Just every month or so? Yes. How did you know that? My precious girl you're not dying. You're growing up. Sorry your mom didn't explain all this to you. She should have, you know. You mean Mom does it, too? All healthy women do, Meggie. Except when they're expecting a baby and then it's needed to nourish the baby inside their womb. You understand? Sort of. Like when it says, "Blessed be the fruit of thy womb, Jesus"? That's right. Do you know what makes babies? Of course, Father. It comes from mating, like the rams and the ewes. I've tried to watch them, but Daddy said I mustn't. But I've heard the boys talking. Isn't that right, Father? Yes, but See, Meggie, it's very different with people. Or it should be. Because God intended, I think that when a man and a woman mate, they do it as a way of showing their love for each other. So it's a mating not just of bodies but of souls. It must be so wonderful. So I understand. Will it be that way for you and me? What? When I grow up and we get married. Meggie, you know priests can't marry. You can always stop being a priest. No. No, Meggie darling. I can never stop being a priest. Not ever. What about those tarts you promised me? Yes, come on. Father, I'm so glad I'm not dying. What would I ever do without you? Silly, you'll never be without me. What would her majesty be wanting with me at this late day? Heaven knows. Still a thousand things to do, and the guests are almost upon us. I'll take that, Judy. I'm going up anyway. Come in. Happy birthday, ma'am. And if we aren't a picture today. Thank you, Pete. But birthdays at our ages are rather a mixed blessing, aren't they? What is that? I was just taking it along to Meggie. I thought you wouldn't mind if the Clearys dressed here so as they wouldn't be dust to the waist from walking. Good. That's a pretty color for Meghann. What do you call it? Ashes of Roses, ma'am. It's quite the thing just now. You will help her dress this evening. We want her to look absolutely irresistible. Has Father de Bricassart arrived yet? No, not yet. But your lawyer, Mr. Gough, is here. Good. Now, I want you both to watch me sign this paper and then I want you to put your names beneath mine. You can write, can't you, Pete? I can manage a little bit. Fine. It's just that you are a witness that this is indeed my signature in case there's ever a question. Good. And please send Harry Gough to me. Yes, ma'am. I'll fetch Mr. Gough. Why, Mrs. Cleary, you look stunning. Thank you. For once, Mary's opened her wallet wide enough to let the moths fly out. She doesn't want her poor relations shaming her on her 75th birthday. I best get this to Meggie or she'll be late. Fee. Why, Paddy you look like a diplomat. Do I? I feel like an undertaker. But you You look just grand. Harry, doesn't she look grand? My dear Fee, you look like the lady of the manor. Is that a legal opinion, Mr. Gough? Help me with these, will you? Yes. I think they'll do, even if they're not quite real. Never you mind. Some day I'm going to buy you the finest strand of pearls in all Australia.
   
My precious girl you're not dying, you're growing up
My precious girl you're not dying, you're growing up
 
When a man and a woman mate
When a man and a woman mate
 
Thorn Birds 7 The ticket to the Vatican
Thorn Birds 7 The ticket to the Vatican
 
You look like the lady of the manor
You look like the lady of the manor